House Republicans expected to force vote on revised Schiff censure

House Republicans are ramping up their efforts to formally rebuke House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Press: Ukraine's not the only outrage Adam Schiff is just blowing smoke with 'witness intimidation' bluster MORE (D-Calif.) as they look to combat the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE.

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, revised his censure resolution to include language blasting the California Democrat for his comments on the committee’s interactions with a whistleblower whose complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry, alleging Schiff purposely misled the public.

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“Whereas, according to a New York Times article on October 2, 2019, Chairman Schiff’s committee staff met with the whistleblower prior to the filing of his complaint, and staff members communicated the content of the complaint to Chairman Schiff,” the updated version of the resolution reads.

“Whereas Chairman Schiff concealed his dealings with the whistleblower from the rest of the Intelligence Committee, and when asked directly in a television interview whether he had any contact with the whistleblower, he lied to the American people and said, 'We have not spoken directly with the whistleblower.'"

The initial version of the resolution has garnered 140 GOP co-sponsors in the lower chamber. It called for Schiff’s resignation over his “parody” remarks about a July 25 phone call in which Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Democrats release two new transcripts ahead of next public impeachment hearings Press: Ukraine's not the only outrage MORE and his son during a hearing in September.

Schiff has defended his comments, arguing the exaggerated comments were made partially in jest. Top Democrats have also defended his handling of the impeachment inquiry.

Biggs is expected to join House Republican leadership — including Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHarris introduces bill to prevent California wildfires McCarthy says views on impeachment won't change even if Taylor's testimony is confirmed House Republicans call impeachment hearing 'boring,' dismiss Taylor testimony as hearsay MORE (R-Calif.), Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseFox's Neil Cavuto rips into Trump over attacks on Chris Wallace's impeachment coverage This week: Round 2 of House impeachment inquiry hearings Trump rips 'nasty' and 'obnoxious' Chris Wallace after he presses Scalise about impeachment MORE (R-La.) and Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Stopgap spending bill includes military pay raise | Schumer presses Pentagon to protect impeachment witnesses | US ends civil-nuclear waiver in Iran Cruz, Graham and Cheney call on Trump to end all nuclear waivers for Iran Pompeo: US ending sanctions waiver for site where Iran resumed uranium enrichment MORE (R-Wyo.), all of whom have signed on to the measure — at a press conference on Wednesday morning.

His resolution is expected to be called up as privileged later this week.

The censure vote, which is intended to allow Congress to publicly show its disapproval of a member's behavior, faces an uphill battle in the Democratic-controlled House.

Updated at 7:44 a.m.