House Republicans expected to force vote on revised Schiff censure

House Republicans are ramping up their efforts to formally rebuke House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGrenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts Democrats call for probe into ouster of State Dept. watchdog GOP lawmakers say they don't want to put Steve King back on committees MORE (D-Calif.) as they look to combat the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpMulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus Former CBS News president: Most major cable news outlets 'unrelentingly liberal' in 'fear and loathing' of Trump An old man like me should be made more vulnerable to death by COVID-19 MORE.

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, revised his censure resolution to include language blasting the California Democrat for his comments on the committee’s interactions with a whistleblower whose complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry, alleging Schiff purposely misled the public.

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“Whereas, according to a New York Times article on October 2, 2019, Chairman Schiff’s committee staff met with the whistleblower prior to the filing of his complaint, and staff members communicated the content of the complaint to Chairman Schiff,” the updated version of the resolution reads.

“Whereas Chairman Schiff concealed his dealings with the whistleblower from the rest of the Intelligence Committee, and when asked directly in a television interview whether he had any contact with the whistleblower, he lied to the American people and said, 'We have not spoken directly with the whistleblower.'"

The initial version of the resolution has garnered 140 GOP co-sponsors in the lower chamber. It called for Schiff’s resignation over his “parody” remarks about a July 25 phone call in which Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE and his son during a hearing in September.

Schiff has defended his comments, arguing the exaggerated comments were made partially in jest. Top Democrats have also defended his handling of the impeachment inquiry.

Biggs is expected to join House Republican leadership — including Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyMcCarthy yanks endorsement of California candidate over social media posts Trump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Mnuchin: More COVID-19 congressional action ahead MORE (R-Calif.), Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes Pelosi makes fans as Democrat who gets under Trump's skin Trump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy MORE (R-La.) and Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyHouse GOP to launch China probes beyond COVID-19 Trump campaign launches new fundraising program with House Republicans The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Former Rep. Harman says Russia is trying to exploit America; Mylan's Heather Bresch says US should make strategic reserve in medicines; Trump unveils leaders of 'Warp Speed' MORE (R-Wyo.), all of whom have signed on to the measure — at a press conference on Wednesday morning.

His resolution is expected to be called up as privileged later this week.

The censure vote, which is intended to allow Congress to publicly show its disapproval of a member's behavior, faces an uphill battle in the Democratic-controlled House.

Updated at 7:44 a.m.