READ: EU ambassador testifies as part of House impeachment inquiry

Gordon SondlandGordon SondlandWhite House withdraws nomination for Pentagon budget chief who questioned Ukraine aid hold Juan Williams: Will the GOP ever curb Trump? House wants documents on McEntee's security clearances MORE, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, told Congress on Thursday that he had no knowledge of the Trump administration allegedly withholding foreign aid in exchange for information on former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen 16 things to know today about coronavirus MORE or his son Hunter.

“Let me state clearly: Inviting a foreign government to undertake investigations for the purpose of influencing an upcoming U.S. election would be wrong," Sondland said in the closed-door hearing, according to his opening statement. "Withholding foreign aid in order to pressure a foreign government to take such steps would be wrong."

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Sondland, a key witness in the House's ongoing impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Barr tells prosecutors to consider coronavirus risk when determining bail: report MORE, said he "did not and would not ever participate in such undertakings."

"In my opinion, security aid to Ukraine was in our vital national interest and should not have been delayed for any reason," he said. In his statement, Sondland also describes his participation in key meetings with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Trump attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani touts experimental coronavirus treatment in private conversations with Trump Trump team picks fight with Twitter, TV networks over political speech Sunday shows preview: As coronavirus spreads in the U.S., officials from each sector of public life weigh in MORE as well as conversations with Trump.

Read Sondland's opening statement to the congressional committees below.