Amash: Some retiring GOP lawmakers may reenter politics once Trump is gone

Independent Michigan Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashOvernight Defense: Foreign policy takes center stage at Democratic debate | House delivers impeachment articles to Senate | Dems vow to force new vote on Trump's border wall House votes to send impeachment articles to Senate Amash: Trump claim about US embassy threats 'seems to be totally made up' MORE speculated Tuesday that some retiring Republican lawmakers may seek office again once President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE leaves office.

Amash, theorizing that numerous White House officials who have defended President Trump’s call to Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky told CNN’s Erin Burnett they “feel trapped in that position.” 

“I hear that from my colleagues on the House floor” he added.

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“They wish they weren’t doing this, and frankly I think a lot of the retirements that we hear about as well are just trying to ride out this president and they might think of coming back into public office later on, once this president’s gone,” Amash said.

Fourteen Republicans have announced they will not seek reelection in 2020, including Rep. Sean DuffySean DuffyGOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts Ex-Tea Party lawmakers turn heads on K Street Why the Wisconsin special election could decide the 2020 presidential election MORE (R-Wis.), who resigned in late September to care for his newborn child who has complex medical needs, and Rep. Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerHouse votes to impeach Trump House impeaches Trump for abuse of power Judiciary members battle over whether GOP treated fairly in impeachment hearings MORE (R-Wis.), the second most senior member of the House, who has served since 1978.

Amash, the co-founder of the House Freedom Caucus, said in June that former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE’s report convinced him Trump has committed impeachable offenses, making him the only congressional Republican to endorse impeachment before he formally left the party and the caucus in July.