Amash: Some retiring GOP lawmakers may reenter politics once Trump is gone

Independent Michigan Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashOn The Trail: How Nancy Pelosi could improbably become president History is on Edward Snowden's side: Now it's time to give him a full pardon Trump says he's considering Snowden pardon MORE speculated Tuesday that some retiring Republican lawmakers may seek office again once President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS reimposes UN sanctions on Iran amid increasing tensions Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally MORE leaves office.

Amash, theorizing that numerous White House officials who have defended President Trump’s call to Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky told CNN’s Erin Burnett they “feel trapped in that position.” 

“I hear that from my colleagues on the House floor” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

“They wish they weren’t doing this, and frankly I think a lot of the retirements that we hear about as well are just trying to ride out this president and they might think of coming back into public office later on, once this president’s gone,” Amash said.

Fourteen Republicans have announced they will not seek reelection in 2020, including Rep. Sean DuffySean DuffyCNN's Ana Navarro to host Biden roundtable on making 'Trump a one-term president' Bottom line McCarthy blasts Pelosi's comments on Trump's weight MORE (R-Wis.), who resigned in late September to care for his newborn child who has complex medical needs, and Rep. Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerRepublicans call for Judiciary hearing into unrest in cities run by Democrats Scott Fitzgerald wins Wisconsin GOP primary to replace Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner Hillicon Valley: House panel grills tech CEOs during much anticipated antitrust hearing | TikTok to make code public as it pushes back against 'misinformation' | House Intel panel expands access to foreign disinformation evidence MORE (R-Wis.), the second most senior member of the House, who has served since 1978.

Amash, the co-founder of the House Freedom Caucus, said in June that former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s report convinced him Trump has committed impeachable offenses, making him the only congressional Republican to endorse impeachment before he formally left the party and the caucus in July.