Ocasio-Cortez, Mooney spar on Twitter over closed-door impeachment hearings

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Energy: Court upholds Trump repeal of Obama fracking rule | Oil price drop threatens fracking boom | EPA eases rules on gasoline sales amid coronavirus Ocasio-Cortez blasts coronavirus stimulus package as 'shameful' on House floor Oil price drop threatens US fracking boom MORE (D-N.Y.) hit back Thursday after Rep. Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyOvernight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation House votes to rein in Trump's military authority MORE (R-W.Va.) accused her of supporting “Soviet style secret hearings in the Capitol basement.”

Mooney accused Ocasio-Cortez of not supporting “Open and Transparent government” after she noted that many of the group of Republican representatives who disrupted a House deposition in a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility were members of the committee and thus would know electronic devices were not allowed in the room.

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“Rep. Mooney, you & I both know that when a massive crime is committed, the 1st step is to separate witnesses & get their stories to see what adds up,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted in response. “You know that making these depositions public will help potential criminals line up their testimony. Why do you want to do that?”

Mooney was one of the nearly two dozen GOP representatives involved in the action, which was led by Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzHarris knocks Gaetz for taking issue with money for Howard in relief package Critics hit Florida governor over lack of 'sweeping' coronavirus response Gaetz accuses Burr of 'screwing all Americans' with stock sale MORE (R-Fla.), one of President TrumpDonald John TrumpHealth insurers Cigna, Humana waive out-of-pocket costs for coronavirus treatment Puerto Rico needs more federal help to combat COVID-19 Fauci says April 30 extension is 'a wise and prudent decision' MORE’s most vocal defenders in the House.

Republicans, including those who entered the SCIF Wednesday, have raised objections to the number of closed-door hearings conducted by the House as part of its impeachment inquiry, while Democrats have invoked the possibility of coordinated testimony if the hearings were open to the public.

However, mindful of the threat of further disruptions, House Democrats are considering taking the hearings public as early as mid-November, according to a Washington Post report Wednesday evening.

“It’s going to be the difference between reading a dry transcript and actually hearing the story from the people who were in the room,” Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesDemocrats get assurances from Cuccinelli on immigrants, coronavirus care Gaetz wears gas mask on House floor during vote on bill to fight coronavirus Democrats press World Bank chief on meeting with Ukrainian president amid Trump pressure MORE (D-Conn.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, told the Post.

“I think the story needs to be told, you know, the story of the abuse of power. ... People like the various ambassadors who have come to testify need to come tell it,” he added.