Ocasio-Cortez calls out GOP lawmakers asking to be arrested, citing privilege

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezThe Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez blasts Tucker Carlson as 'white supremacist sympathizer' Julián Castro jabs ICE: 'Delete your account' MORE (D-N.Y.) called out the GOP lawmakers who asked to be arrested for storming the closed-door impeachment hearing Wednesday for relying on “mountains of entitlement and privilege.”

Ocasio-Cortez condemned the Republican House members for their “little flash mob,” saying members of “my community” would not comprehend someone requesting their own arrest.

“There have been many aspects of the GOP’s little flash mob that have relied on mountains of entitlement and privilege, but them *asking* the police to be arrested is just…” she tweeted.

“Well, let’s just say my community would find it hard to understand why *anyone* would ask to be arrested,” she added.

The New York Democrat responded to reports from Fox News that some GOP House members, who barged into the sensitive compartmented information facility (SCIF) during the impeachment inquiry deposition of a Pentagon Official Laura Cooper, asked to be arrested.

The GOP lawmakers stormed the SCIF in protest of how House Democrats, particularly Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffDemocrats seek leverage for trial Pence's office denies Schiff request to declassify call with Ukrainian leader Comey, Schiff to be interviewed by Fox's Chris Wallace MORE (D-Calif.), have conducted the initial hearings in private.

Ocasio-Cortez feuded with Rep. Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyOcasio-Cortez calls out GOP lawmakers asking to be arrested, citing privilege Ocasio-Cortez, Mooney spar on Twitter over closed-door impeachment hearings House Republican defends protest of closed-door hearing MORE (R-W.Va.) on Twitter earlier Thursday after he accused her of backing “Soviet style secret hearings in the Capitol basement.” 

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She responded by posting, “You know that making these depositions public will help potential criminals line up their testimony. Why do you want to do that?”

The impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats worried by Jeremy Corbyn's UK rise amid anti-Semitism Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 MORE began after a whistleblower report detailed a call he made to the Ukrainian president, in which Trump asked him to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats seek leverage for trial Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE and his son.