Katie Hill calls out a 'double standard' in final floor speech

Outgoing Rep. Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillGOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts Pelosi announces Porter, Haaland will sit on Oversight panel Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders's decision to revoke Young Turks founder's endorsement MORE (D-Calif.) in her final floor speech Thursday called out a “double standard” she said led her to resign, highlighting the contrast between the allegations leveled against her and the multiple accusations of sexual misconduct against President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE and other men in powerful positions. 

“I am leaving now because of a double standard,” Hill said, doubling down on her criticism of what she described as a misogynistic culture that works to "push a young woman out of power" while men accused of sexual crimes remain in top positions.

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“I am leaving, but we have men who have been credibly accused of intentional acts of sexual violence and remain in board rooms, on the Supreme Court, in this very body and — worst of all — in the Oval Office,” she added.

Trump has denied allegations of sexual misconduct. Supreme Court Justices Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasSanders campaign official: Biden 'actively courted pro-segregation senators' to block black students from white schools Electability is key to Democrats' 2020 fortunes Congress grants military members partial victory, but Feres Doctrine survives MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughDemocratic group plans mobile billboard targeting Collins on impeachment January reminds us why courts matter — and the dangers of 'Trump judges' Planned Parenthood launches M campaign to back Democrats in 2020 MORE have also denied allegations of sexual misconduct made against them.

 

 

Hill, who announced Sunday she would be resigning, apologized to her supporters, staff and friends and said she would never shirk her own responsibility for her “sudden ending” in Congress. Her last day in office will be Friday, she said. 

“I am leaving because there is only one investigation that deserves the attention of this country and that’s the one we voted on today,” Hill said, following the House vote on a resolution setting impeachment procedures. 

“And so today, as my last vote, I voted on impeachment proceedings. Not just because of corruption, obstruction of justice or gross misconduct, but because of the deepest abuse of power, including the abuse of power over women,” she said.

Hill said her vote in favor of the impeachment proceedings was on behalf of women across the country.

“We will not stand down. We will not be broken. We will not be silenced. We will rise, and we will make tomorrow better than today,” she said.

Three fellow Democratic freshmen, Reps. Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia Ayanna Pressley opens up about having alopecia for first time, reveals bald head in interview Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chair endorses Sanders MORE (Mass.), Joe NeguseJoseph (Joe) NeguseJudiciary members battle over whether GOP treated fairly in impeachment hearings Sunday talk shows: Lawmakers gear up ahead of Monday's House Judiciary hearing Pelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention MORE (Colo.) and Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia Democrats worry party is squandering political opportunity on ObamaCare Overnight Health Care — Presented by Rare Access Action Project — Court ruling reignites ObamaCare fight for 2020 | Congress expands probe into surprise billing | Health industry racks up wins in year-end spending deal MORE (Ill.), sat in the chamber in front of Hill as she delivered her farewell address in a show of solidarity. They all approached Hill afterward to give her hugs.

Hill said in part she was leaving because she didn’t want “right wing media to drive clicks and expand their audience” by distributing nude photos of her distributed without her knowledge or consent.

She announced she’d be resigning earlier this week after the conservative website RedState and the Daily Mail published nude photos of her.

Hill said in her floor speech it was the first time she had left her apartment since the photos were published, adding that she’s had thousands of “vile, threatening” emails, calls and texts that made her “fear for her life” and the lives of those around her. 

Along with the publication of photos, reports alleged Hill had relationships with a campaign and legislative staffer.

Hill, who identifies as bisexual, admitted to having a relationship with a woman on her campaign. She denied having a relationship with a member of her legislative staff, which would be in violation of House rules.

She faced a House ethics probe ahead of her announced resignation. 

Hill has blamed the allegations on an “abusive” ex-husband she is divorcing and Republican operatives.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment Trump chooses high-profile but controversial legal team Trump: Impeachment timing intended to hurt Sanders MORE (D-Calif.) said Thursday the decision to resign was by Hill’s own choosing. She said she was “sad” to see the freshman lawmaker leave but respected her decision. 

Christina Marcos contributed