Whistleblower would answer Republicans questions in impeachment inquiry: lawyer

A lawyer for the anonymous whistleblower whose complaint helped spark the impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE said Sunday that his client would answer written questions from House Republicans as part of the impeachment inquiry.

Mark Zaid posted on Twitter that his legal team has offered GOP lawmakers a chance to interrogate his client through writing as Republicans have pushed to make the whistleblower’s identity known. 

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He said he gave the offer to Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesEthics complaint filed against Nunes asks how he's paying for lawsuits The Hill's Morning Report - Can Sanders be stopped? Trump creates new headaches for GOP with top intelligence pick MORE (R-Calif.), the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, as he tries to protect the whistleblower’s identity from exposure, which he said “could jeopardize their safety, as well as that of their family.”

“So we have offered to @DevinNunes, Ranking HPSCI Member, opportunity for Minority to submit through legal team written questions to WBer,” he tweeted. “Qs cannot seek identifying info, regarding which we will not provide, or otherwise be inappropriate. We will ensure timely answers.”

Trump and the Republican Party have seized on the whistleblower's anonymity, saying it undermines their credibility in interpreting the controversial call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. In the call, Trump asked Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket MORE and Biden's son.

News of the whistleblower report prompted Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Stone judge under pressure over calls for new trial MORE (D-Calif.) to launch the impeachment inquiry. House Democrats have said they don’t need the whistleblower’s testimony because other testimonies have supplied enough information for the investigation.