Shimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering

Shimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering
© Greg Nash

Rep. John ShimkusJohn Mondy ShimkusRepublicans eye legislation to rival Democrats' sweeping climate plan Overnight Energy: House passes sweeping bill on 'forever chemicals' | Green groups question Pentagon about burning of toxic chemicals | Steyer plan would open US to climate refugees House passes sweeping bill to target spread of toxic 'forever chemicals' MORE (R-Ill.) on Monday reaffirmed his intention to retire at the end of his term after saying last week he was reconsidering amid pressure from constituents and colleagues.

"I was asked by local Republicans, party leaders in Washington, DC, and a bipartisan group of rank and file House members to reconsider my retirement. I was honored by their outreach. In response to their lobbying, I promised to seriously consider the request, which I did last week in DC and this past weekend at home," Shimkus said in a statement.

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"After weighing the pros and cons, I have decided to reaffirm my plan to retire,” he added.

Shimkus, one of the top Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, announced his retirement at the end of August, but admitted he was “reconsidering” last week, shortly after Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenConservative groups aim to sink bipartisan fix to 'surprise' medical bills Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 Republicans offer details on environmental proposals after Democrats roll out plan MORE (R-Ore.), the committee’s ranking member, also announced his retirement.

Several of Shimkus’ fellow GOP committee members have also expressed interest in the top spot, including Reps. Bob Latta (Ohio), Brett GuthrieSteven (Brett) Brett GuthrieOvernight Health Care: Big Pharma looks to stem losses after trade deal defeat | House panel to examine federal marijuana policies | House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers Lawmakers express alarm over rise in cocaine overdose deaths House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers over role in crisis MORE (Ky.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersKoch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says Lawmakers voice skepticism over Facebook's deepfake ban House Ethics Committee finds McMorris Rodgers misused official resources MORE (Wash.) and Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessOvernight Health Care: Big Pharma looks to stem losses after trade deal defeat | House panel to examine federal marijuana policies | House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers Lawmakers express alarm over rise in cocaine overdose deaths Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware MORE (Texas), according to the publication.

Since initially announcing his retirement, Shimkus also issued some of the most withering criticisms of any House Republican about President TrumpDonald John TrumpRouhani says Iran will never seek nuclear weapons Trump downplays seriousness of injuries in Iran attack after US soldiers treated for concussions Trump says Bloomberg is 'wasting his money' on 2020 campaign MORE's decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northeastern Syria, telling KMOX’s Mark Reardon, “I called my chief of staff in D.C., I said ‘pull my name off the "I support Donald Trump" list.’ We have just stabbed our allies in the back. The Kurds go back all the way to the first Gulf War.”