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House Democrats pull subpoena for ex-Trump national security official

House Democrats withdrew a subpoena Wednesday for a former national security official to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump, Jared Kusher's lawyer threatens to sue Lincoln Project over Times Square billboards Facebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' MORE.

Democrats pulled the subpoena for Charles Kupperman, who served as a deputy to former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonJohn Kelly called Trump 'the most flawed person' he's ever met: report Bolton: North Korea 'more dangerous now' Demand for Trump-related titles sparks expected record year for political books MORE, about a week after a federal judge fast-tracked the case.

“The subpoena at issue in this matter has been withdrawn and there is no current intention to reissue it,” Democrats wrote in their request, according to a court filing.

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Although Democrats said they won't reissue the subpoena, the chairmen of the committees leading the impeachment investigation asked Kupperman’s attorneys if the former Bolton aide would testify if the court rules in a separate case that former White House counsel Don McGahn must comply with his subpoena.

In both cases, the dispute centered around Trump’s argument that his aides have “absolute immunity” from complying with congressional subpoenas.

“Unless your lawsuit was admittedly only for purposes of delay, and without a subpoena in force, the Committees expect that your client will voluntarily dismiss the complaint he filed in the United States District Court of the District of Columbia on the same day he received Committee’s subpoena and be guided by the decision in McGahn,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGreenwald slams Schiff over Biden emails on Fox Hillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats | House Democrats slam FCC over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats MORE (D-Calif.), Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelOvernight Defense: Trump, Biden set to meet in final debate | Explicit Fort Bragg tweets were sent by account administrator | China threatens retaliation over Taiwan arms sale Is Trump a better choice for Jewish voters than Biden? Overnight Defense: Trump says he's leaving Walter Reed, 'feeling really good' after COVID-19 treatment | White House coronavirus outbreak grows | Dems expand probe into Pompeo speeches MORE (D-N.Y.), and acting Oversight and Reform Committee Chairwoman Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyTrump, House lawyers return to court in fight over subpoena for financial records Safeguarding US elections by sanctioning Russian sovereign debt Fears grow of voter suppression in Texas MORE (D-N.Y.) wrote in a letter to Kupperman's attorneys.

Kupperman’s attorneys, Michael Kirk and Charles Cooper, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

"There is no proper basis for a witness to sue the Congress in court to oppose a duly authorized congressional subpoena," a House Intelligence Committee official said Wednesday. "Nevertheless, given the schedule of our impeachment hearings, a court process that leads to the dismissal of Dr. Kupperman’s flawed lawsuit would only result in delay, so we have withdrawn his subpoena."

"If Dr. Kupperman or other witnesses over whom the White House might assert absolute immunity to prevent their testimony are truly interested in honoring their duty to uphold the Constitution instead of hiding behind the White House’s improper directions, they have every opportunity to do so, as numerous current and former officials — both senior and more junior — have courageously done," the official added.

An attorney for Kupperman had previously described the former aide as being caught in a “classic Catch-22,” between the request to testify and Trump’s argument that administration officials have immunity from complying with the subpoenas.

Kupperman is considered a key witness since he was on the July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that is at the center of the impeachment inquiry.

Judge Richard Leon, a George W. Bush appointee, had fast-tracked the case over the disputed subpoena, setting a Dec. 10 date for oral arguments.

But House Democrats are readying to moving the impeachment inquiry forward, setting the first public hearing dates for next week.

Democrats announced Wednesday that three witnesses will testify in public hearings next week.

William Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat to Ukraine, and George Kent, a top State Department official, will testify next Wednesday. Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch is expected to testify next Friday, according to Schiff.

So far, all testimony has been given behind closed doors. House Democrats began releasing transcripts of those depositions earlier this week.