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Democrats aim to impeach Trump by Christmas

House Democrats are moving aggressively to wrap up their historic, weeks-long investigation into President TrumpDonald John TrumpHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Police called after Florida moms refuse to wear face masks at school board meeting about mask policy Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline MORE before 2020, potentially setting up a climactic vote to impeach him just before Christmas.

The timeline has come into sharper focus as Democrats have made a series of critical moves signaling they are shutting down the closed-door fact-finding phase of the inquiry and shifting now to Phase 2: making the case for impeachment to the American public.

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Congressional investigators, led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffCIA impeachment whistleblower forced to live under surveillance due to threats: report In our 'Bizarro World' of 2020 politics, the left takes a wrong turn Greenwald slams Schiff over Biden emails on Fox MORE (D-Calif.), appear to have wrapped up the last of 15 private depositions of current and former Trump administration officials. This week they began publishing thousands of pages of transcripts from those interviews.

And next week, Democrats will launch the first public, televised hearings of their nearly seven-week-long impeachment inquiry, calling three career foreign service officials who have already testified that Trump, his personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Teenager who filmed George Floyd's death to be honored 11 arrested after clashes at 'Jews for Trump' rally in New York MORE and their allies were seeking a brazen quid pro quo with Ukraine.

“I think, without being hasty, again, but being expeditious and deliberative, that the House ought to set for themselves a target of having dealt with this in the Intelligence Committee and Foreign Affairs and Oversight and the Judiciary Committee and on the floor by Christmas,” Rep. Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (D-Wash.), a member of the Intelligence Committee, told CNN’s “The Situation Room” on Thursday night.

“That's a tough schedule. But it's a doable schedule, given where we're at and all the work that's been done thus far,” Heck said.

There are other signs that Democrats are charging toward a December floor vote to make Trump just the third president in U.S. history to be impeached.

Several top Trump officials who played pivotal roles in the administration's dealings with Ukraine — including Energy Secretary Rick PerryRick PerryIn partisan slugfest, can Chip Roy overcome Trump troubles? Is Social Security safe from the courts? Trump, Biden set for high-stakes showdown MORE and acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyGaffes put spotlight on Meadows at tough time for Trump Trump says he may lower corporate tax rate to 20 percent if reelected Is Social Security safe from the courts? MORE — have defied subpoenas compelling them to testify behind closed doors, but Democrats have shown little appetite to resolve the matter in court.

After watching their Mueller and Russia probes get bogged down in never-ending court battles, Democrats appear to be moving on without testimony from those key witnesses rather than engage in another lengthy lawsuit against the administration.

“We're not going to delay our work. That would merely allow these witnesses and the White House to succeed with their goal, which is to delay, deny, obstruct,” Schiff recently said.

If Democrats can stick to their aggressive timetable, they could be on track to reach the end of their impeachment inquiry in the days right before Christmas.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Trump should accept election results 'like a man' The spectre of pension failures haunts this election Microsoft: Iranian hacking group targeting attendees of major international security conferences MORE (Calif.) and other Democrats insist that they’ll take as long as the process requires, but many hope it can be wrapped up before the presidential campaign begins in earnest with the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3.

To speed things along, Democrats have indicated their witness list for the public hearings will be limited. That means they will only bring in people who offered the most detailed or firsthand knowledge of events during earlier closed-door appearances.

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“The Majority does not intend to request public testimony from every witness who previously testified in depositions or interviews as part of the impeachment inquiry,” Schiff wrote in a letter to Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesTrump pushing to declassify document disputing intel findings on Russia: report Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus cases surge in the Midwest; Trump hits campaign trail after COVID-19 Democrat Arballo gains on Nunes: internal poll MORE (Calif.), the top Republican on the Intelligence panel, offering the opportunity for the minority to request public witnesses. Democrats have veto power over any GOP requests.

The public hearings will start with a bang on Wednesday when Democrats call William Taylor, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who testified it was his “clear understanding” that the administration was withholding nearly $400 million in military aid until Kiev opened investigations into Trump’s political opponents, including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline Overnight Defense: Trump campaign's use of military helicopter raises ethics concerns | Air Force jets intercept aircraft over Trump rally | Senators introduce bill to expand visa screenings MORE.

George Kent, another top State Department official, also will appear before Congress that day.

Then on Friday, Marie Yovanovitch, the former ambassador to Ukraine who was recalled from her post due to perceived insufficient loyalty to Trump, will go before the cameras.

“Giuliani and his team were running a shadow operation of U.S. foreign policy. The real public servants of America were trying to dislodge corruption, and Giuliani and his team were trying to exploit corruption and deepen corruption,” Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinCongress must repeal tax breaks for the wealthy passed in CARES Act COVID-19 and the problem of presidential succession Warren, Porter to headline progressive fundraiser supporting seven swing state candidates MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Oversight and Judiciary committees who has been attending the private depositions, told The Hill.

“The Ukraine shakedown was not some kind of aberration but rather the expression of the complete policy on the part of the president,” Raskin added. “The goal of public hearings is to situate the president’s potential high crimes and misdemeanors within a comprehensible history.”

Those three hearings will be followed by second week of public testimony before Congress adjourns for a weeklong break for the Thanksgiving holiday. Two National Security Council staffers, Fiona Hill and Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, are among those who could be called to testify then.

Sometime in early December, Schiff — along with the chairs of other two investigating committees — is expected to forward a report and recommendations for articles of impeachment to Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMarijuana stocks see boost after Harris debate comments Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL Democrats shoot down talk of expanding Supreme Court MORE (D-N.Y.), who is in charge of the third phase of impeachment. The veteran lawmaker will be tasked with figuring out which articles get sent to the House floor for a vote.

Nadler also could hold public hearings, where the president and his counsel could be present, though it remains unclear whether the Judiciary panel plans to take those steps.

“It depends on, does the president or minority want to call witnesses who haven't been fact witnesses, who haven't been testified already. I don't know that. … We'll have to see,” Nadler said on MSNBC’s “All in with Chris Hayes.”

From there, the 41-member Judiciary Committee would draft articles of impeachment — likely focusing on things like abuse of power and obstruction of justice — and vote to send them to the House floor. Only then would all House lawmakers be able to vote on impeachment, potentially the week before Christmas.

From there the impeachment process would move over to the Senate, which under current rules would be required to conduct a trial that could take weeks to complete. Both parties have a political incentive for an expeditious trial that could arrive as soon as January: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Battle for Senate 'a 50-50 proposition' 'Packing' federal courts is already a serious problem What a Biden administration should look like MORE (R-Ky.) wants to quickly acquit Trump so Republicans can shift to other priorities like confirming judges; Democrats don’t want their 2020 presidential hopefuls, like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWhat a Biden administration should look like Overnight Defense: Dems want hearing on DOD role on coronavirus vaccine | US and India sign data-sharing pact | American citizen kidnapped in Niger Conservative operatives Wohl, Burkman charged in Ohio over false robocalls MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersOcasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' What a Biden administration should look like Ocasio-Cortez: 'Trump is the racist visionary, but McConnell gets the job done' MORE (I-Vt.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTrump fights for battleground Arizona Biden to air 90-minute radio programs targeting Black voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden's big battleground | Trump and Harris hit the trail in Arizona | Turnout surges among new voters MORE (D-Calif.), to get stuck in a lengthy, inside-the-Beltway impeachment trial.

One possible complication to the emerging timeline is the fact that lawmakers also need to figure out how to avoid another government shutdown amid the partisan acrimony.

Government funding expires on Nov. 21. But given the lack of progress on appropriations — despite a bipartisan budget deal struck in late July — congressional leaders are eyeing another stopgap measure to extend funding to sometime in December.

That means the House could be faced with an impeachment vote just as the threat of another holiday-season shutdown looms.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHoyer lays out ambitious Democratic agenda for 2021, with health care at top Top Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate Trump orders aides to halt talks on COVID-19 relief MORE (D-Md.) said in a letter to colleagues on Friday that he is “hopeful” lawmakers can fully fund the government before year’s end, even amid the impeachment fight.

“The House is continuing to do important work for the people, even as our committees continue the impeachment inquiry. We can, and we will, continue to make progress on critical issues while upholding our Constitutional duty,” Hoyer wrote.