Schiff denies GOP calls for Trump whistleblower to testify: 'Redundant and unnecessary'

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSchiff uses Tiananmen anniversary to condemn Trump's response to protests Flynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE (D-Calif.) on Saturday effectively denied Republican lawmakers' request for a government whistleblower to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal plan to contain Washington protests employs 7,600 personnel: report GOP Rep calls on primary opponent to condemn campaign surrogate's racist video Tennessee court rules all registered voters can obtain mail-in ballots due to COVID-19 MORE

Schiff, who has helped lead the impeachment hearings of Trump and his dealings with Ukraine, said in a letter to Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald Nunes Sunday shows preview: Leaders weigh in as country erupts in protest over George Floyd death The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (R-Calif.), the ranking member of the Intelligence panel, that the whistleblower's testimony would be "redundant" and "unnecessary," according to multiple reports.

"The impeachment inquiry, moreover, has gathered an ever-growing body of evidence — from witnesses and documents, including the President's own words in his July 25 call record — that not only confirms, but far exceeds, the initial information in the whistleblower's complaint," Schiff said. "The whistleblower's testimony is therefore redundant and unnecessary.

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Schiff added that "the individual's appearance before us would only place their personal safety at grave risk" because of Trump's repeated threats. 

The whistleblower complaint accusing Trump of pushing Ukraine to open investigations for his political benefit led House Democrats in September to launch an impeachment inquiry. Multiple House committees have heard depositions from numerous former and current administration officials corroborating the whistleblower's account behind closed doors, and public hearings are scheduled for this week. 

The investigation has centered around allegations that Trump urged Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate 2020 presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenOVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Murkowski, Mattis criticism ratchets up pressure on GOP over Trump| Esper orders hundreds of active-duty troops outside DC sent home day after reversal | Iran releases US Navy veteran Michael White Davis: 72 hours cementing the real choice for November OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump signs order removing environmental reviews for major projects | New Trump air rule will limit future pollution regulations, critics say | DNC climate group calls for larger federal investment on climate than Biden plan MORE and that military aid was tied to Kiev publicly declaring the probe.

Schiff's statement came just hours after Republicans sent him a letter including a list of individuals they'd like to testify in the public impeachment hearings. The government whistleblower and former Vice President Joe Biden's son, Hunter Biden, were included on the list

Nunes on Friday also formally requested that Schiff privately testify amid the investigation, arguing that the congressman was making a "show trial" of the impeachment inquiry.

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In his letter to Nunes, Schiff emphasized that he wouldn't allow lawmakers to use the open hearings to carry out "sham" investigations into the Biden family. 

"The committee also will not facilitate efforts by President Trump and his allies in Congress to threaten, intimidate and retaliate against the whistleblower who courageously raised the initial alarm," he said. 

Trump and several Republicans have become increasingly outspoken in their push for the whistleblower to testify. Trump claimed last week that the figure had to "come forward" because the person got it "sooo wrong."