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Schiff says he wants to speak with constituents before deciding on impeachment

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHillicon Valley: Intel heads to resume threats hearing scrapped under Trump | New small business coalition to urge action on antitrust policy | Amazon backs corporate tax hike to pay for infrastructure Intel heads to resume worldwide threats hearing scrapped under Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Biden tasks Harris on border; news conference today MORE (D-Calif.) said on Sunday that the facts in the impeachment inquiry are "not contested" but that he has not yet personally decided where he stands in terms of supporting the impeachment of President TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE

Schiff, who has led the probe, said on CNN's "State of the Union" that the "facts" are "not contested." He said there is overwhelming evidence based on testimony from various fact witnesses that backs allegations that Trump solicited foreign interference in the 2020 election. 

But Schiff would not go as far as to say he supports impeachment. 

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"I want to discuss this with my constituents and colleagues before I make a final judgment on this," Schiff said. 

CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperOmar: Minneapolis community is 'on edge' around Chauvin trial GOP governor: Infrastructure proposal looks more like the Green New Deal Sanders says 'a lot more work has to be done' on 'human infrastructure' MORE asked Schiff how he has not yet come to a conclusion if he believes there are overwhelming facts that back his position.

"I certainly think that the evidence has been produced overwhelmingly shows serious misconduct from the president," Schiff said. "I certainly want to hear more from my constituents and more from my colleagues."

"At the end of the day, this is a decision about whether the Founding Fathers had in mind this kind of misconduct when they gave Congress this remedy. And I have to think that this is very much central to what they were concerned about, that is an unethical man or woman takes that office, uses it for their personal political gain," Schiff said. 

"If that wasn't what the founders had in mind, it's hard to imagine what they did," he added.