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Pelosi on fight against climate change: The House is 'still in it'

Pelosi on fight against climate change: The House is 'still in it'
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Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms | Pelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks | Poll: Most Americans support raising taxes on those making at least 0K Battle heats up for House Foreign Affairs gavel Nearly one-third of US adults expect to lose employment income: Census Bureau MORE (D-Calif.) told a United Nations summit on Monday that the Democratic-controlled House was "still in" the fight against climate change even following the Trump administration's withdrawal from the Paris climate accord.

At the opening of the 2019 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Pelosi addressed world leaders and pledged Congress's support for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

"This is a mission, this is a passion, this is a scientifically-based approach, to all. We are here to say to all of you, on behalf of the House of Representatives and the Congress of the United States, 'we're still in it.'"

The Trump administration has been heavily criticized by Democrats including all of the top 2020 presidential contenders for President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE's decision to exit the accord, which seeks to limit the rise in global temperatures to 2 degrees Celsius. Under Trump, the U.S. has instead expanded oil and natural gas production.

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoUS to temporarily withdraw some embassy personnel in Baghdad: report Pompeo to host indoor holiday parties at State Department despite warning to employees to hold some missions virtually The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Pressure builds as UK approves COVID-19 vaccine MORE announced earlier last month that the U.S. had formally begun the process of withdrawing from the landmark agreement, which would have put the U.S. on target to reduce emissions about 28 percent by 2025.

"President Trump made the decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement because of the unfair economic burden imposed on American workers, businesses, and taxpayers by U.S. pledges made under the Agreement," Pompeo said in November. "The United States has reduced all types of emissions, even as we grow our economy and ensure our citizens’ access to affordable energy."