Pelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi calls Trump's decision to withdraw US from WHO 'an act of extraordinary senselessness' House Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO MORE (D-Calif.) is beginning to send out feelers to gauge if members are interested in serving as impeachment managers, a high-profile role that will put those chosen for it in a political spotlight.

Pelosi’s office has quietly reached out to some members she believes could serve as managers, while others have pushed their own names forward, multiple sources tell The Hill. 

Unlike the past two modern impeachment inquiries into sitting presidents that only included House Judiciary Committee members as managers, sources say they believe Pelosi may shake things up by adding managers from the House Intelligence Committee.

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Pelosi tapped House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.) to lead the evidence-gathering part of the impeachment inquiry. Intelligence is now set to hand its report to the House Judiciary Committee, which will draft articles of impeachment.

Here are some of the members seen as contenders for the critical positions.

Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesGun control group rolls out House endorsements Pelosi: George Floyd death is 'a crime' Tara Reade's attorney asks Biden to authorize search of his Senate papers MORE (N.Y.)

Jeffries, the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, is viewed as being a likely to definite choice.

He’d check a series of boxes: Jeffries is in leadership, is a senior member of the Judiciary Committee and is in the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC). He’s also close to Pelosi and is seen as a potential future Speaker.

Jeffries frequently appears on cable television, as is known for his attacks on the president during hearings and a disciplined adherence to promoting his party’s agenda.

Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse holds first-ever proxy votes during pandemic Dozens of Democrats plan to vote remotely in a first for the House House members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes MORE (Md.)

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Raskin has emerged as a key player on the Judiciary panel over the past year, in large part because of his more than two decades of work as a constitutional lawyer.

House Democrats have increasingly leaned on him to help distill complex questions surrounding the Constitution amid allegations that the president is violating the laws of the land.

It is a role Raskin has embraced and makes him a likely impeachment manager, say sources on Capitol Hill.

Raskin is also a member of the Oversight and Reform Committee and has actively participated in the closed-door witness depositions seeking to investigate claims that President TrumpDonald John TrumpMichael Flynn transcripts reveal plenty except crime or collusion 50 people arrested in Minneapolis as hundreds more National Guard troops deployed Missouri state lawmaker sparks backlash by tweeting 'looters deserve to be shot' MORE pressed Ukraine to open two investigations that would benefit him politically, including one into his 2020 political rival, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump campaign launches Asian Pacific Americans coalition Biden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Liberal group asks Klobuchar to remove herself from VP consideration because of prosecutorial record MORE.

Rep. Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers House punts on FISA, votes to begin negotiations with Senate MORE (Calif.)

Lofgren, another close Pelosi ally, is considered a possible choice as an impeachment manager given her unique role as the only House member who worked on both House impeachment cases against former Presidents Clinton and Nixon.

In the Clinton years, Lofgren served as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, where she is now a senior member. In the Nixon era, she worked as a congressional staffer.

Lofgren isn’t seen as a sure thing for a role as an impeachment manager. Some sources suggested she likely only would be tapped if House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality House Democrats call on DOJ to investigate recent killings of unarmed black people  Gun control group rolls out House endorsements MORE (D-N.Y.) is not a manager.

It might be a bit of a surprise for Nadler to not be chosen since the Judiciary chairman was one of the 13 impeachment managers when House Republicans made their case against Clinton.

But Pelosi could choose to buck the previous model. She and Nadler clashed over pressing forward with impeachment after former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE filed his report. Yet Nadler as Judiciary chairman would have a strong claim for a role. 

Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineTrump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers demand answers on Chinese COVID hacks | Biden re-ups criticism of Amazon | House Dem bill seeks to limit microtargeting House Democrat to introduce bill cracking down on ad targeting MORE (R.I.)

Cicilline, the head of House Democrats’ messaging arm, is also viewed as a possible contender.

As a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, Cicilline took on an active role during the closed-door deposition phase of the impeachment inquiry. He is also viewed as someone who is out front pushing Democrats’ talking points and agenda. 

In late May, Cicilline broke with Pelosi by throwing his support behind impeachment proceedings after Mueller spoke publicly about his investigation’s findings.

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Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellGloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump visits a ventilator plant in a battleground state MORE (Calif.)

Swalwell is another possible choice, according to sources, who note he’s close to Pelosi.

The Speaker may also want to place fellow California lawmakers in a few of the impeachment roles given the state serves as her largest base of support.

Swalwell, a former prosecutor, serves on both the Judiciary and Intelligence committees, which would allow him to follow the inquiry from its start on Intelligence to its conclusion with Judiciary.

Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsBiden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Rep. Demings, former police chief, urges review of police practices after death of George Floyd Minneapolis erupts for third night as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation MORE (Fla.)

Demings is another potential pick who would check a lot of boxes, sources told The Hill.

Demings, a CBC member, is the only other House Democrat to sit on both the Judiciary and Intelligence panels.

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As a former police chief, she would bring a law enforcement background to the role.

Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.)

Schiff is probably the most recognizable face of the impeachment inquiry after nearly two weeks of televised hearings leading the evidence-gathering portion of the Democrats’ Ukraine investigation.

If Pelosi chooses to add Intelligence members to the impeachment managers mix, Schiff is well positioned to get a spot.

As committee chairman, Schiff kept a tight grip on the gavel, infuriating Republicans who allege he hasn't been conducting a fair process. Some GOP members even want to call him as a witness.

But his tight control of the process and even-keel demeanor won him applause from Democratic colleagues.

Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierAir Force documents acknowledged 'persistent' racial bias in justice system HHS watchdog says actions should be free from political interference Five factors influencing when the House returns MORE (Calif.)

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Speier, a Californian who represents a district adjacent to the Speaker’s district, is a longtime friend and ally of Pelosi. She too is seen by colleagues as a potential pick.

During the Intelligence hearings, Speier appeared composed, prepared and searing, when needed.

Earlier this year, Speier dropped out of her bid for the Oversight gavel. At the time, she said she’d back off if Pelosi cautioned the caucus could not afford a messy fight in the middle of the impeachment push. Some sources said they believe this will give Speier leverage for an impeachment manager role.

Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesDemocrats debate how and when to get House back in action Democrats get assurances from Cuccinelli on immigrants, coronavirus care Gaetz wears gas mask on House floor during vote on bill to fight coronavirus MORE (Conn.)

Himes, the second most senior Intelligence member, is also seen as a contender.

Himes impressed some Democrats with his measured questioning of witnesses during the open hearings, remaining level as he sought to elicit answers from witnesses while also bashing Republicans for their attacks against certain witnesses. 

Rep. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroJulián Castro launches PAC to support progressive candidates Minority lawmakers gain unprecedented clout amid pandemic The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden leads Trump by 6 points in new poll MORE (Texas)

Castro, the chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus who worked as a lawyer before his political career, is also seen as being in the running.

Castro’s twin brother, Julian CastroJulian CastroCastro, Warren, Harris to speak at Texas Democratic virtual convention Julián Castro to become senior advisor for Voto Latino It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE, is running for president in 2020, but it’s unclear whether this would figure into Pelosi’s decision on impeachment managers.

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiHouse subcommittee says Trump administration did not adequately screen travelers from Italy, South Korea for COVID-19 Lawmakers push for mental health funding for providers in next aid package FDA grants emergency approval to Swiss firm's coronavirus antibody test MORE (Ill.)

Krishnamoorthi, who previously practiced law in Chicago and sits on the Intelligence and Oversight panels, has also had his name floated as being in the mix.

He’s also been a prominent face for his party on television, hammering the president over allegations of wrongdoing and highlighting damaging testimony.