Nadler misses procedural step in impeachment process for family emergency

Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Judiciary Committee postpones hearing with Barr amid coronavirus outbreak House Democrats plead with key committee chairman to allow remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Pelosi rejects calls to shutter Capitol: 'We are the captains of this ship' MORE (D-N.Y.), the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, will miss the final procedural step in the impeachment process before the House casts a final vote as he tends to a family emergency.

Two Democratic sources told The Hill that Nadler is away from Congress on Tuesday because his wife is ill.

Nadler’s absence comes the same day as the House Rules Committee is scheduled to set the terms of the chamber’s floor debate on voting on two articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpPelosi eyes end of April to bring a fourth coronavirus relief bill to the floor NBA to contribute 1 million surgical masks to NY essential workers Private equity firm with ties to Kushner asks Trump administration to relax rules on loan program: report MORE.

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The whole chamber is expected to cast a final vote on the articles Wednesday. They are expected to pass along a roughly party-line vote with possibly a handful of Democratic defections.

The New York Democrat is anticipated to return to Washington late Tuesday or early Wednesday, according to Politico. Rep. Jaime Raskin (D-Md.), another member of the Judiciary panel, is expected to present the articles of impeachment to the Rules Committee.

The two articles of impeachment center around abuse of power over Trump’s pressuring of Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSome Sanders top allies have urged him to withdraw from 2020 race: report Sunday shows preview: As coronavirus spreads in the U.S., officials from each sector of public life weigh in Trump defends firing of intel watchdog, calling him a 'disgrace' MORE, a chief political rival, and obstruction of Congress over his commands to administration officials to defy congressional subpoenas for testimony and documents.

Scott Wong contributed to this report.