Democrats rally behind Pelosi on delay of articles

House Democrats on Thursday are rallying behind Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions Overnight Health Care: Average daily COVID infections topped last summer's peak, CDC says | US reaches 70 percent vaccination goal a month after Biden's target | White House says CDC can't renew eviction ban Biden, Pelosi struggle with end of eviction ban MORE (D-Calif.) after she said she'll delay the delivery of impeachment articles to the Senate in an effort to ensure a fair trial.

President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions The Memo: Left pins hopes on Nina Turner in Ohio after recent defeats Biden administration to keep Trump-era rule of turning away migrants during pandemic MORE has urged a speedy trial in the upper chamber, and Pelosi's allies argue that delaying the delivery of the articles will put pressure on Senate GOP leaders to call witnesses and seek more evidence surrounding the president's dealings with Ukraine — steps Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions GOP skepticism looms over bipartisan spending deal On The Money: Biden, Pelosi struggle with end of eviction ban | Trump attorney says he will fight release of tax returns MORE (R-Ky.) has said he'll not take.

Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierJimmy and Rosalynn Carter celebrate 75th anniversary, longest-married presidential couple Military braces for sea change on justice reform House panel plans mid-July consideration of military justice overhaul MORE (D-Calif.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said Pelosi's delay strategy made for "a very wise decision on her part."

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"I think it gives her leverage; it gives the House leverage in terms of making sure that it's not going to be a kangaroo court over there," she told reporters in the Capitol. "If, in fact, they intend to not be an impartial reviewer of the facts, then it becomes a joke. And we're not party to a joke."

McConnell has shown no indication he's ready to budge. Aside from refusing new witnesses, he's also announced that he'll work closely with the White House as the trial proceeds, a stance that has infuriated Democrats who say as an impeachment juror he should be taking steps to be impartial.

But McConnell has rejected that argument. 

“I’m not impartial about this at all,” he told reporters Tuesday in the Capitol.

Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerBiden backs effort to include immigration in budget package Biden to meet with 11 Democratic lawmakers on DACA: report Britney Spears's new attorney files motion to remove her dad as conservator MORE (D-N.Y.), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said Thursday that those comments should make McConnell ineligible to oversee the impeachment trial.

"Mitch McConnell has a problem. Mitch McConnell has said that he's going to work hand-and-glove with the White House. He has said that he's not a fair juror. I don't understand how he can possibly take the oath that he's required to take," Nadler said.

"Mitch McConnell, I think, has disqualified himself from taking the oath of participating."

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The debate arrives the morning after House Democrats passed two impeachment articles through the lower chamber: one accusing the president of abusing his power in his dealings with Ukraine, the other alleging that he obstructed Congress as Democrats sought to investigate the affair.

Shortly afterward, Pelosi said Democrats would not send those articles to the Senate immediately, citing an "unfair" process being prepared by GOP leaders in the upper chamber.

"So far we haven’t seen anything that looks fair to us,” she added.

That strategy was not new: House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse bundling is bad for deliberation CBC presses Biden to extend eviction moratorium Top House Democrats call on Biden administration to extend eviction moratorium MORE (D-Md.) had said as much on Tuesday. But Pelosi also left open the possibility that the delay could be extensive, even permanent, as some liberals in her caucus are promoting the idea of preventing the Senate trial from ever happening at all.

Yet most Democrats on Thursday dismissed the idea that the House would delay the deliver forever.

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"I would doubt that," said Nadler, quickly deferring the decision to Pelosi.

"I don't think there's anything that the Speaker said last night [to] suggest that this it's permanent," echoed Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.).

Rep. Dan KildeeDaniel (Dan) Timothy KildeeOvernight Energy: Manchin grills Haaland over Biden oil and gas review | Biden admin reportedly aims for 40 percent of drivers using EVs by 2030 |  Lack of DOD action may have caused 'preventable' PFAS risks Equilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — Cockatoo cooperation key to suburban survival Watchdog: Lack of DOD action may have caused 'preventable' risks from 'forever chemicals' MORE (D-Mich.) agreed, suggesting there are political risks if Democrats wait too long.

"I don't think it's something we would want to drag out forever," he said, "but obviously it makes sense."