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Pelosi: Trump's impeachment 'cannot be erased'

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Pelosi pushes for drug pricing measure | South Africa to resume administering Johnson & Johnson vaccine | Early data indicate Pfizer, Moderna vaccines safe for pregnant women Allow a vote on the 'Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act' Female Republicans 'horrified' by male GOP lawmaker's description of Cheney: report MORE (D-Calif.) ahead of a vote on Wednesday to send House-passed articles of impeachment to the Senate for a trial doubled down on comments that impeachment will forever be a part of President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump: LeBron James's 'racist rants' are divisive, nasty North Carolina man accused of fraudulently obtaining .5M in PPP loans Biden announces picks to lead oceans, lands agencies MORE's legacy.

During House floor debate on a resolution naming the seven House lawmakers who will serve as prosecutors — also known as impeachment managers — in the Senate trial, Pelosi said that the outcome in the upper chamber won't change the fact that the lower chamber voted to impeach the president.

The House, she said, was about to "cross a very important threshold in American history" by sending over the articles of impeachment accusing Trump of abusing his power and obstructing Congress.

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"Yes, it is a fact: When someone is impeached, they are always impeached. It cannot be erased. So I stand by that comment, although I know you don't like hearing it," Pelosi said in remarks in response to Republicans defending Trump.

Pelosi previously said that Trump is "impeached for life."

“This president is impeached for life regardless of any gamesmanship on the part of Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTim Scott to deliver GOP response to Biden's speech to Congress GOP state attorneys general urge Biden, Congress not to expand Supreme Court The Memo: Washington's fake debate on 'bipartisanship' MORE,” she said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week." “There is nothing the Senate can do to ever erase that.”

Pelosi on Wednesday also dismissed complaints from Republicans questioning why she held onto the articles of impeachment for nearly a month in an attempt to pressure Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to agree to demands for witness testimony.

She noted that she resisted calls for impeachment for months despite growing agitation among Democrats to launch the proceedings for other controversies that emerged long before Trump's efforts to pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate his political opponents while withholding nearly $400 million in military aid.

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Many Democrats had called for launching an impeachment inquiry over the obstruction of justice allegations in former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's investigation into Russian election interference, but Pelosi resisted.

"Don't talk to me about my timing," Pelosi said.

"For a long time, I resisted the calls from across the country for impeachment of the president for obvious violations of the Constitution that he had committed. But recognizing the divisiveness of impeachment, I held back. Frankly, I said, this president isn't worth it. But when he acted the way he did in relationship to withholding funds from Ukraine in return for a benefit to him that was personal and political, he crossed a threshold. He gave us no choice," Pelosi continued.

"He gave us no choice," she repeated for emphasis.

Earlier on Wednesday, Pelosi named the seven Democrats who will serve as impeachment managers: House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGroups see new openings for digging up dirt on Trump Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he Hillicon Valley: Biden administration sanctions Russia for SolarWinds hack, election interference MORE (Calif.), Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHillicon Valley: Tech companies duke it out at Senate hearing | Seven House Republicans vow to reject donations from Big Tech Wyden-Paul bill would close loophole allowing feds to collect private data Jim Jordan, Val Demings get in shouting match about police during hearing MORE (N.Y.), Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After historic verdict, Chauvin led away in handcuffs Waters on Chauvin guilty verdict: 'I'm not celebrating, I'm relieved' Lawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' MORE (N.Y.), House Administration Committee Chairwoman Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenCapitol Police officer allegedly told units to only monitor for 'anti-Trump' protesters on Jan. 6 Hillicon Valley: Tech companies duke it out at Senate hearing | Seven House Republicans vow to reject donations from Big Tech Wyden-Paul bill would close loophole allowing feds to collect private data MORE (Calif.), and Reps. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsDemings asked about Senate run after sparring with Jordan on police funding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After historic verdict, Chauvin led away in handcuffs Jim Jordan, Val Demings get in shouting match about police during hearing MORE (Fla.), Jason CrowJason CrowOvernight Energy: Biden reportedly will pledge to halve US emissions by 2030 | Ocasio-Cortez, Markey reintroduce Green New Deal resolution Five questions about Biden withdrawal from Afghanistan Managers seek to make GOP think twice about Trump acquittal MORE (Colo.) and Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaBiden pledges support for Texas amid recovery from winter storm Biden turns focus to winter storm with Texas trip K Street navigates virtual inauguration week MORE (Texas).

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During the House floor debate on the resolution, Pelosi sat in a row with all the impeachment managers except for Nadler, who was handling the debate for Democrats.

The Speaker concluded her remarks by comparing the gravity of Congress considering impeachment of a president to authorizing war.

"This is as serious as it gets for any of us. Only the vote to declare war would be something more serious than this. We take it very seriously. It's not personal. It's not political. It's not partisan. It's patriotic," Pelosi said.

--This report was updated at 3:48 p.m.