Haaland, Davids included in 'Jeopardy' clue for historic first as Native American congresswomen

Haaland, Davids included in 'Jeopardy' clue for historic first as Native American congresswomen
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Freshman Reps. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Internal watchdog probing Park Police actions toward Lafayette Square protesters | Democrats detail their .5T green infrastructure plan | Green groups challenge Trump water rules rollback Internal watchdog probing Park Police actions toward Lafayette Square protesters Judge orders Mnuchin to give Native American tribes full stimulus funding MORE (D-N.M.) and Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter WATCH LIVE: The Hill's LGBTQ+ summit featuring Adam Rippon, Rep. Sharice Davids, Chasten Buttigieg and more MORE (D-Kan.) were featured in a “Jeopardy” clue Wednesday night for making history as the first Native American congresswomen.

The game show category was “U.S. representatives” and the clue was “Deb Haaland of the Laguna Pueblo and Sharice Davids of the Ho-Chunk Nation are the first women of this group in Congress.”

Contestant Laura Thomason gave the correct answer: Native American.

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“@ShariceDavids and I may have been the first, but we won’t be the last!” Haaland tweeted after the episode aired. “More Native Women are choosing to run for office at every level. Sharice and I both see them and we are here to support them every step of the way! #BeFierce.”

The women made history during the 2018 midterms when they became the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Haaland wore a traditional Pueblo dress along with silver and turquoise jewelry for the swearing-in ceremony in January 2019 and the pair went viral when they were seen embracing on the House floor.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffDemocrats hit Trump for handling of Russian bounty allegations after White House briefing Voters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November Democrats face tough questions with Bolton MORE (D-Calif.) was an answer on “Jeopardy!” earlier this week. No one buzzed in to identify him.