Meadows: Republicans who break with Trump could face political repercussions

 
His comments come as centrist GOP lawmakers in the upper chamber face mounting pressure to vote to bring in additional witnesses for the trial in the wake of a bombshell New York Times report. The Times reported Sunday night that former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHave the courage to recognize Taiwan McConnell says Obama administration 'did leave behind' pandemic plan Trump company lawyer warned Michael Cohen not to write 'tell-all' book: report MORE wrote in his upcoming memoir that President Trump told him him aid to Ukraine was conditional upon the country launching investigation into the Bidens.
 
Meadows, one of Trump’s closest allies in Congress who was selected to serve on the president’s impeachment defense team, said yes when asked by Norah O'Donnell if Republican senators "face political repercussions" if they deviate from Trump.
 
“I mean listen, I don't want to speak for my Senate colleagues. But there are always political repercussions for every vote you take,” Meadows said. “There is no vote that is higher profile than this.”
 
The White House and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSchumer to GOP: Cancel 'conspiracy hearings' on origins of Russia probe Overnight Health Care: Trump says US 'terminating' relationship with WHO | Cuomo: NYC on track to start reopening week of June 8 | COVID-19 workplace complaints surge 10 things to know today about coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.) have pushed back against Democrats’ calls to bring in additional witnesses, and Republicans have largely voted against amendments for key administration officials to testify at the start of the proceedings in the upper chamber. But the Times report has led moderates, including Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits | House Republicans introduce bill to speed mining projects for critical minerals | Watchdog faults EPA communications in contamination of NC river Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits GOP senators urge Trump not to restrict guest worker visas MORE (R-Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDemocrats broaden probe into firing of State Department watchdog Coronavirus and America's economic miracle Former Romney strategist joins anti-Trump Lincoln Project MORE (R-Utah), to state they are interested in hearing what Bolton has to say.
“I think this witness question is a very important one. Oftentimes, we're asked over 50 percent of the American people want the us to call witness,” Stefanik told CBS. “That doesn't just mean John Bolton. That means the whistleblower. That means Hunter Biden. And it really opens up challenges for the Democrats."
 
And Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsGOP women's group rolls out endorsements ahead of contested races Bossie, Lewandowski warned Trump he was in trouble in 2020: report The Hill's Campaign Report: GOP beset by convention drama MORE (Ga.), the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee and a member of the president’s impeachment defense team, said Democrats in swing states also face challenges. 
 
“The question needs to be flipped. Where is a courageous Democrat who will actually look at the facts and vote in favor of not impeaching this president? I think the question is, and I understand we're Republicans here, and I understand your question, but the question is always asked from the side of: 'Will a Republican take this bold and courageous step to stand up to this president?' ” he told O’Donnell. "My question is where is a Democrat who will actually look at the facts and not simply follow behind Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi calls Trump's decision to withdraw US from WHO 'an act of extraordinary senselessness' House Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO MORE and Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE and Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerFederal judges should be allowed to be Federalist Society members Warren condemns 'horrific' Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests, other senators chime in VA hospitals mostly drop hydroxychloroquine as coronavirus treatment MORE, or their presidential candidates who are sitting in the jury pool, and follow them?”