Meadows: Republicans who break with Trump could face political repercussions

 
His comments come as centrist GOP lawmakers in the upper chamber face mounting pressure to vote to bring in additional witnesses for the trial in the wake of a bombshell New York Times report. The Times reported Sunday night that former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonWant to evaluate Donald Trump's judgment? Listen to Donald Trump Will Pence primary Trump — and win? Bolton: Trump lacked enough 'advance thinking' for a coup MORE wrote in his upcoming memoir that President Trump told him him aid to Ukraine was conditional upon the country launching investigation into the Bidens.
 
Meadows, one of Trump’s closest allies in Congress who was selected to serve on the president’s impeachment defense team, said yes when asked by Norah O'Donnell if Republican senators "face political repercussions" if they deviate from Trump.
 
“I mean listen, I don't want to speak for my Senate colleagues. But there are always political repercussions for every vote you take,” Meadows said. “There is no vote that is higher profile than this.”
 
The White House and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGrassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa House Democrats grow frustrated as they feel ignored by Senate Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines MORE (R-Ky.) have pushed back against Democrats’ calls to bring in additional witnesses, and Republicans have largely voted against amendments for key administration officials to testify at the start of the proceedings in the upper chamber. But the Times report has led moderates, including Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhy Biden's Interior Department isn't shutting down oil and gas Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (R-Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal Schumer leaves door open for second vote on bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (R-Utah), to state they are interested in hearing what Bolton has to say.

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP's Banks burnishes brand with Pelosi veto Former speed skater launches bid for Stefanik seat House GOP leaders say vaccine works but shouldn't be mandated MORE (R-N.Y.), who is also on Trump’s defense team, argued calling additional witnesses may not work out the way Democrats believe it will. 

“I think this witness question is a very important one. Oftentimes, we're asked over 50 percent of the American people want the us to call witness,” Stefanik told CBS. “That doesn't just mean John Bolton. That means the whistleblower. That means Hunter Biden. And it really opens up challenges for the Democrats."
 
And Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsLoeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run Georgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock Poll shows tight GOP primary for Georgia governor MORE (Ga.), the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee and a member of the president’s impeachment defense team, said Democrats in swing states also face challenges. 
 
“The question needs to be flipped. Where is a courageous Democrat who will actually look at the facts and vote in favor of not impeaching this president? I think the question is, and I understand we're Republicans here, and I understand your question, but the question is always asked from the side of: 'Will a Republican take this bold and courageous step to stand up to this president?' ” he told O’Donnell. "My question is where is a Democrat who will actually look at the facts and not simply follow behind Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMcCarthy: Pelosi appointing members of Jan. 6 panel who share 'pre-conceived narrative' Kinzinger denounces 'lies and conspiracy theories' while accepting spot on Jan. 6 panel Pelosi taps Kinzinger to serve on Jan. 6 panel MORE and Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse erupts in anger over Jan. 6 and Trump's role Six takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections Lobbying world MORE and Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerCould Andrew Cuomo — despite scandals — be re-elected because of Trump? Democratic negotiator: 'I believe we will' have infrastructure bill ready on Monday DACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats MORE, or their presidential candidates who are sitting in the jury pool, and follow them?”