Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation

A handful of House lawmakers crossed party lines Thursday on legislation designed to rein in President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran.

The two measures came to the floor less than a month after Trump authorized an airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a move largely lauded by Republicans but criticized by Democrats who questioned the constitutionality of the action.

Four Republicans — Reps. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) Gaetz2020 on my mind: Democrats have to think like Mitch McConnell Harris knocks Gaetz for taking issue with money for Howard in relief package Critics hit Florida governor over lack of 'sweeping' coronavirus response MORE (Fla.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonLawmakers shame ex-Wells Fargo directors for failing to reboot bank Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieLawmakers outline proposals for virtual voting The Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina emerges as key battleground for Senate control The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump blends upbeat virus info and high US death forecast MORE (Ky.) and Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthThe housing affordability crisis is a reality: Lawmakers need to act, but responsibly Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation MORE (Ind.) — crossed the aisle to support the bill authored by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaDemocrats eye additional relief checks for coronavirus Defense Production Act urgently needed for critical medical gear 20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order MORE (D-Calif.) that would block funding for military force in Iran without congressional approval.

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The measure passed in a 228-175 vote, with GOP proponents of the measure arguing Congress needs to reclaim its constitutional powers.

“Under Article II of the Constitution, the President ALWAYS has the legal authority and moral obligation to respond to attacks and imminent threats. Khanna’s bill worked to make that clear by referencing the War Powers Resolution,” Davidson told The Hill.

Hollingsworth focused on the funding aspect.

“Funding our military operations is an essential Constitutional duty reserved only for Congress," he said in a statement. "Our Commander in Chief should be able to take isolated and decisive action to keep Americans and service members safe, as President Trump has, but only Congress can declare and fund a war."

A spokeswoman for Massie added that the Kentucky Republican “supports President Trump, and his vote today was not about the president.”

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“Our Founding Fathers believed that Congress—not the President—should possess this power," the spokeswoman stated. "Congressman Massie opposes any military action against Iran without a congressional declaration of war.”

Meanwhile, three Democratic lawmakers — Reps. Conor Lamb (Pa.), Ben McAdams (Utah) and Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse votes to condemn Trump Medicaid block grant policy Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation Group of Democrats floating censure of Trump instead of impeachment: report MORE (Ore.) — voted against Khanna's measure.

The lawmakers' offices did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The House passed a second Iran-related measure, one that would repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF).

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeCBS All Access launches animated 'Tooning Out the News' series Bill banning menthol in cigarettes divides Democrats, with some seeing racial bias Democrats spar with DeVos at hearing, say Trump budget would 'privatize education' MORE (D-Calif.), garnered support from 11 Republicans: Gaetz, Davidson and Massie, as well as Reps. Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Michael Cloud (Texas), Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherGOP lawmaker touts bill prohibiting purchases of drugs made in China Wisconsin Republican says US must not rely on China for critical supplies We weren't ready for a pandemic — imagine a crippling cyberattack MORE (Wis.), Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyOvernight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation House votes to rein in Trump's military authority MORE (W.Va.), Jamie Herrera Beutler (Wash.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyTop conservatives pen letter to Trump with concerns on fourth coronavirus relief bill The Hill's 12:30 Report: House to vote on .2T stimulus after mad dash to Washington Conservative lawmakers tell Trump to 'back off' attacks on GOP colleague MORE (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertCampaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis Hispanic Caucus campaign arm unveils non-Hispanic endorsements Carper staffer tests positive in Delaware MORE (Ariz.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonOvernight Defense: Pentagon curtails more exercises over coronavirus | House passes Iran war powers measure | Rocket attack hits Iraqi base with US troops House passes measure limiting Trump's ability to take military action against Iran House passes .3 billion measure to fight coronavirus MORE (Mich.).

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GOP lawmakers who voted in favor of the measure argued the AUMF is outdated and needs to be overhauled.

"It’s past time to start practicing some AUMF hygiene by taking outdated authorizations off the books," Gallagher said in a statement. "The 2002 AUMF is no longer relevant and its repeal should have no material impact on ongoing operations in the Middle East."

“But let me clear: the conversation shouldn’t end today. We in Congress should continue to debate other existing AUMFs and the War Powers Resolution more broadly in order to reclaim this institution’s most important constitutional authority,” he added.

Gaetz, a staunch Trump ally, argued the U.S. needs to take steps to end its involvement in “forever wars.”

“I come to vote my heart. Instead of sending our soldiers to blood-stained sands of the Middle East, let's care for veterans here at home,” he said on the floor. “Instead of ill-fated adventurism, let's put America first. The best time to vote against the Iraq War was 2002. The second best is today."

A number of Republicans took issue with Democrats using an unrelated bill to pass the measures, preventing the GOP from having the opportunity to attempt to alter the bill at the eleventh hour on the floor.

Just two Democrats voted against Lee's measure: Lamb and Rep. Jim CooperJames (Jim) Hayes Shofner CooperAs VA's budget continues to Increase, greater oversight is required Stacey Abrams cheers on Taylor Swift: 'Your activism has inspired Americans' Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation MORE (Tenn.).

“I was not in Congress when the current AUMFs were passed. I have supported past measures repealing the 2001 and 2002 AUMFs, which also gave Congress time to replace them,” Cooper said in a statement. “This is the most complex region in the world and repealing a law without a replacement strategy is no way to keep our troops or America safe.”