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Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation

A handful of House lawmakers crossed party lines Thursday on legislation designed to rein in President TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran.

The two measures came to the floor less than a month after Trump authorized an airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a move largely lauded by Republicans but criticized by Democrats who questioned the constitutionality of the action.

Four Republicans — Reps. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzKinzinger: Conspiracy theory FBI planned Jan. 6 example of 'legacy of Trump and Trumpism' 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol Florida congressional candidate says opponents conspiring to kill her MORE (Fla.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl Davidson21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Boehner finally calls it as he sees it MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold Massie14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday Congress tiptoes back to normality post-pandemic 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol MORE (Ky.) and Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthGOP gambles with Pelosi in opposing Jan. 6 commission The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel Hillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump campaign tweet of Biden clip as manipulated media | Democrats demand in-person election security briefings resume | Proposed rules to protect power grid raise concerns MORE (Ind.) — crossed the aisle to support the bill authored by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaDemocrats shift tone on unemployment benefits Khanna outlines how progressives will push in climate infrastructure proposal Fresh hurdles push timeline on getting China bill to Biden MORE (D-Calif.) that would block funding for military force in Iran without congressional approval.

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The measure passed in a 228-175 vote, with GOP proponents of the measure arguing Congress needs to reclaim its constitutional powers.

“Under Article II of the Constitution, the President ALWAYS has the legal authority and moral obligation to respond to attacks and imminent threats. Khanna’s bill worked to make that clear by referencing the War Powers Resolution,” Davidson told The Hill.

Hollingsworth focused on the funding aspect.

“Funding our military operations is an essential Constitutional duty reserved only for Congress," he said in a statement. "Our Commander in Chief should be able to take isolated and decisive action to keep Americans and service members safe, as President Trump has, but only Congress can declare and fund a war."

A spokeswoman for Massie added that the Kentucky Republican “supports President Trump, and his vote today was not about the president.”

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“Our Founding Fathers believed that Congress—not the President—should possess this power," the spokeswoman stated. "Congressman Massie opposes any military action against Iran without a congressional declaration of war.”

Meanwhile, three Democratic lawmakers — Reps. Conor Lamb (Pa.), Ben McAdams (Utah) and Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderOvernight Health Care: US buying additional 200M Moderna vaccine doses | CureVac's COVID-19 vaccine failed in preliminary trial results | Grassley meets with House Dems on drug prices Grassley meets with moderate House Democrats on lowering drug prices Pharmaceutical industry donated to two-thirds of Congress ahead of 2020 elections: analysis MORE (Ore.) — voted against Khanna's measure.

The lawmakers' offices did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The House passed a second Iran-related measure, one that would repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF).

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeOvernight Defense: House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq war powers | Pentagon leaders press senators to reimburse National Guard | New pressure on US-Iran nuclear talks House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq war powers Overnight Defense: Biden, Putin agree to launch arms control talks at summit | 2002 war authorization repeal will get Senate vote | GOP rep warns Biden 'blood with be on his hands' without Afghan interpreter evacuation MORE (D-Calif.), garnered support from 11 Republicans: Gaetz, Davidson and Massie, as well as Reps. Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Michael Cloud (Texas), Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherBiden budget includes 0M to help agencies recover from SolarWinds hack in proposed budget GOP lawmaker calls for Wuhan probe to 'prevent the next pandemic' Lawmakers introduce bill to protect critical infrastructure against cyberattacks MORE (Wis.), Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier Mooney14 Republicans vote against resolution condemning Myanmar military coup Republicans block 25th Amendment resolution to oust Trump House to vote on impeaching Trump Wednesday MORE (W.Va.), Jamie Herrera Beutler (Wash.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene Roy14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week MORE (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertShakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' On The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP DCCC targets Republicans for touting stimulus bill they voted against MORE (Ariz.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonFauci: Emails highlight confusion about Trump administration's mixed messages early in pandemic Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (Mich.).

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GOP lawmakers who voted in favor of the measure argued the AUMF is outdated and needs to be overhauled.

"It’s past time to start practicing some AUMF hygiene by taking outdated authorizations off the books," Gallagher said in a statement. "The 2002 AUMF is no longer relevant and its repeal should have no material impact on ongoing operations in the Middle East."

“But let me clear: the conversation shouldn’t end today. We in Congress should continue to debate other existing AUMFs and the War Powers Resolution more broadly in order to reclaim this institution’s most important constitutional authority,” he added.

Gaetz, a staunch Trump ally, argued the U.S. needs to take steps to end its involvement in “forever wars.”

“I come to vote my heart. Instead of sending our soldiers to blood-stained sands of the Middle East, let's care for veterans here at home,” he said on the floor. “Instead of ill-fated adventurism, let's put America first. The best time to vote against the Iraq War was 2002. The second best is today."

A number of Republicans took issue with Democrats using an unrelated bill to pass the measures, preventing the GOP from having the opportunity to attempt to alter the bill at the eleventh hour on the floor.

Just two Democrats voted against Lee's measure: Lamb and Rep. Jim CooperJim CooperLiberal advocacy group stirs debate, discomfort with primary challenges Progressive group backing primary challenger to Tennessee Democrat GOP leader to try to force Swalwell off panel MORE (Tenn.).

“I was not in Congress when the current AUMFs were passed. I have supported past measures repealing the 2001 and 2002 AUMFs, which also gave Congress time to replace them,” Cooper said in a statement. “This is the most complex region in the world and repealing a law without a replacement strategy is no way to keep our troops or America safe.”