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Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation

A handful of House lawmakers crossed party lines Thursday on legislation designed to rein in President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSAID administrator tests positive for COVID-19 Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year DOJ appeals ruling preventing it from replacing Trump in E. Jean Carroll defamation lawsuit MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran.

The two measures came to the floor less than a month after Trump authorized an airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a move largely lauded by Republicans but criticized by Democrats who questioned the constitutionality of the action.

Four Republicans — Reps. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzGaetz: Trump 'should pardon everyone' including himself to quash liberal 'bloodlust' Florida passes 850k coronavirus cases Florida GOP Rep. Mike Waltz tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (Fla.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonHillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieCheney seeks to cool tensions with House conservatives House in near-unanimous vote affirms peaceful transfer of power Ron Paul hospitalized in Texas MORE (Ky.) and Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthHillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump campaign tweet of Biden clip as manipulated media | Democrats demand in-person election security briefings resume | Proposed rules to protect power grid raise concerns Lawmakers call for bipartisan push to support scientific research The Hill's 12:30 Report: Presidential race tightens in key states MORE (Ind.) — crossed the aisle to support the bill authored by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaBiden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden eyes new leadership at troubled public lands agency | House progressives tout their growing numbers in the chamber at climate rally | Trump administration pushes for rollback of Arctic offshore drilling regulations House progressives tout their growing numbers in the chamber at climate rally MORE (D-Calif.) that would block funding for military force in Iran without congressional approval.

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The measure passed in a 228-175 vote, with GOP proponents of the measure arguing Congress needs to reclaim its constitutional powers.

“Under Article II of the Constitution, the President ALWAYS has the legal authority and moral obligation to respond to attacks and imminent threats. Khanna’s bill worked to make that clear by referencing the War Powers Resolution,” Davidson told The Hill.

Hollingsworth focused on the funding aspect.

“Funding our military operations is an essential Constitutional duty reserved only for Congress," he said in a statement. "Our Commander in Chief should be able to take isolated and decisive action to keep Americans and service members safe, as President Trump has, but only Congress can declare and fund a war."

A spokeswoman for Massie added that the Kentucky Republican “supports President Trump, and his vote today was not about the president.”

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“Our Founding Fathers believed that Congress—not the President—should possess this power," the spokeswoman stated. "Congressman Massie opposes any military action against Iran without a congressional declaration of war.”

Meanwhile, three Democratic lawmakers — Reps. Conor Lamb (Pa.), Ben McAdams (Utah) and Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes The 14 Democrats who broke with their party on coronavirus relief vote House votes to condemn Trump Medicaid block grant policy MORE (Ore.) — voted against Khanna's measure.

The lawmakers' offices did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The House passed a second Iran-related measure, one that would repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF).

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDemocrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Top contender for Biden Defense chief would be historic pick Overnight Defense: 5 US service members killed in international peacekeeping helicopter crash in Egypt | Progressives warn Biden against Defense nominee with contractor ties | Trump executive order to ban investment in Chinese military-linked companies MORE (D-Calif.), garnered support from 11 Republicans: Gaetz, Davidson and Massie, as well as Reps. Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Michael Cloud (Texas), Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherReestablishing American prosperity by investing in the 'Badger Belt' Actors union blasts Democrat for criticizing GOP lawmaker's wife Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats MORE (Wis.), Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members House GOP lawmakers urge Senate to confirm Vought Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial MORE (W.Va.), Jamie Herrera Beutler (Wash.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyThe Hill's Morning Report - Too close to call Chip Roy fends off challenge from Wendy Davis to win reelection in Texas Democrats seek wave to bolster House majority MORE (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertHouse GOP proposed rules change sparks concern Next Congress expected to have record diversity Embattled Schweikert beats back Democratic challenge in Arizona MORE (Ariz.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonPressure grows from GOP for Trump to recognize Biden election win Republican Michigan congressman: 'The people have spoken' GOP lawmaker patience runs thin with Trump tactics MORE (Mich.).

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GOP lawmakers who voted in favor of the measure argued the AUMF is outdated and needs to be overhauled.

"It’s past time to start practicing some AUMF hygiene by taking outdated authorizations off the books," Gallagher said in a statement. "The 2002 AUMF is no longer relevant and its repeal should have no material impact on ongoing operations in the Middle East."

“But let me clear: the conversation shouldn’t end today. We in Congress should continue to debate other existing AUMFs and the War Powers Resolution more broadly in order to reclaim this institution’s most important constitutional authority,” he added.

Gaetz, a staunch Trump ally, argued the U.S. needs to take steps to end its involvement in “forever wars.”

“I come to vote my heart. Instead of sending our soldiers to blood-stained sands of the Middle East, let's care for veterans here at home,” he said on the floor. “Instead of ill-fated adventurism, let's put America first. The best time to vote against the Iraq War was 2002. The second best is today."

A number of Republicans took issue with Democrats using an unrelated bill to pass the measures, preventing the GOP from having the opportunity to attempt to alter the bill at the eleventh hour on the floor.

Just two Democrats voted against Lee's measure: Lamb and Rep. Jim CooperJim CooperSpokesperson says Tennessee Democrat made 'poor analogy' in saying South Carolina voters have extra chromosome House Democrat to DeJoy: 'Is your backup plan to be pardoned like Roger Stone?' House Democrats call on State Department for information on Uighur prisoner Ekpar Asat MORE (Tenn.).

“I was not in Congress when the current AUMFs were passed. I have supported past measures repealing the 2001 and 2002 AUMFs, which also gave Congress time to replace them,” Cooper said in a statement. “This is the most complex region in the world and repealing a law without a replacement strategy is no way to keep our troops or America safe.”