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Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation

A handful of House lawmakers crossed party lines Thursday on legislation designed to rein in President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran.

The two measures came to the floor less than a month after Trump authorized an airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a move largely lauded by Republicans but criticized by Democrats who questioned the constitutionality of the action.

Four Republicans — Reps. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzGrenell hints at potential California gubernatorial bid Trump to reemerge on political scene at CPAC Former Trump officials eye bids for political office MORE (Fla.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieCan members of Congress carry firearms on the Capitol complex? Republicans rally to keep Cheney in power House Republicans gear up for conference meeting amid party civil war MORE (Ky.) and Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthHillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump campaign tweet of Biden clip as manipulated media | Democrats demand in-person election security briefings resume | Proposed rules to protect power grid raise concerns Lawmakers call for bipartisan push to support scientific research The Hill's 12:30 Report: Presidential race tightens in key states MORE (Ind.) — crossed the aisle to support the bill authored by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaBiden seeks to walk fine line with Syria strike Overnight Defense: Biden sends message with Syria airstrike | US intel points to Saudi crown prince in Khashoggi killing | Pentagon launches civilian-led sexual assault commission Biden 'disappointed' in Senate parliamentarian ruling but 'respects' decision MORE (D-Calif.) that would block funding for military force in Iran without congressional approval.

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The measure passed in a 228-175 vote, with GOP proponents of the measure arguing Congress needs to reclaim its constitutional powers.

“Under Article II of the Constitution, the President ALWAYS has the legal authority and moral obligation to respond to attacks and imminent threats. Khanna’s bill worked to make that clear by referencing the War Powers Resolution,” Davidson told The Hill.

Hollingsworth focused on the funding aspect.

“Funding our military operations is an essential Constitutional duty reserved only for Congress," he said in a statement. "Our Commander in Chief should be able to take isolated and decisive action to keep Americans and service members safe, as President Trump has, but only Congress can declare and fund a war."

A spokeswoman for Massie added that the Kentucky Republican “supports President Trump, and his vote today was not about the president.”

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“Our Founding Fathers believed that Congress—not the President—should possess this power," the spokeswoman stated. "Congressman Massie opposes any military action against Iran without a congressional declaration of war.”

Meanwhile, three Democratic lawmakers — Reps. Conor Lamb (Pa.), Ben McAdams (Utah) and Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderDNC releases video hitting Republicans on vote against coronavirus relief bill Biden calls for 'quick action' in Senate on coronavirus relief package House Democrats pass sweeping .9T COVID-19 relief bill with minimum wage hike MORE (Ore.) — voted against Khanna's measure.

The lawmakers' offices did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The House passed a second Iran-related measure, one that would repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF).

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeLawmakers, Martin Luther King III discuss federal responses to systematic racism The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Ahead: One-shot vax, easing restrictions, fiscal help Hillicon Valley: Biden signs order on chips | Hearing on media misinformation | Facebook's deal with Australia | CIA nominee on SolarWinds MORE (D-Calif.), garnered support from 11 Republicans: Gaetz, Davidson and Massie, as well as Reps. Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Michael Cloud (Texas), Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherLawmakers to roll out legislation reorganizing State cyber office House Republicans gear up for conference meeting amid party civil war Back to the future: America must renew its commitment to scientific inquiry MORE (Wis.), Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyRepublicans block 25th Amendment resolution to oust Trump House to vote on impeaching Trump Wednesday READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE (W.Va.), Jamie Herrera Beutler (Wash.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyHouse passes sweeping protections for LGBTQ people GOP's Chip Roy vows to fight Equality Act in court Conservatives go after Cheney for Trump CPAC remarks MORE (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertBiden meets with bipartisan senators to discuss potential infrastructure bill Lawmakers offer competing priorities for infrastructure plans The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Which path will Democrats take on COVID-19 bill? MORE (Ariz.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonUpton censured for vote to remove Marjorie Taylor Greene from Education Committee Is the 'civil war' in the Republican Party really over? Michigan GOP committee deadlocks on resolution to censure Meijer over impeachment vote MORE (Mich.).

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GOP lawmakers who voted in favor of the measure argued the AUMF is outdated and needs to be overhauled.

"It’s past time to start practicing some AUMF hygiene by taking outdated authorizations off the books," Gallagher said in a statement. "The 2002 AUMF is no longer relevant and its repeal should have no material impact on ongoing operations in the Middle East."

“But let me clear: the conversation shouldn’t end today. We in Congress should continue to debate other existing AUMFs and the War Powers Resolution more broadly in order to reclaim this institution’s most important constitutional authority,” he added.

Gaetz, a staunch Trump ally, argued the U.S. needs to take steps to end its involvement in “forever wars.”

“I come to vote my heart. Instead of sending our soldiers to blood-stained sands of the Middle East, let's care for veterans here at home,” he said on the floor. “Instead of ill-fated adventurism, let's put America first. The best time to vote against the Iraq War was 2002. The second best is today."

A number of Republicans took issue with Democrats using an unrelated bill to pass the measures, preventing the GOP from having the opportunity to attempt to alter the bill at the eleventh hour on the floor.

Just two Democrats voted against Lee's measure: Lamb and Rep. Jim CooperJim CooperDeJoy apologizes for mail delays while defending Postal Service changes Colorado presses Biden to reverse Trump Space Command move Five centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote MORE (Tenn.).

“I was not in Congress when the current AUMFs were passed. I have supported past measures repealing the 2001 and 2002 AUMFs, which also gave Congress time to replace them,” Cooper said in a statement. “This is the most complex region in the world and repealing a law without a replacement strategy is no way to keep our troops or America safe.”