Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation

A handful of House lawmakers crossed party lines Thursday on legislation designed to rein in President TrumpDonald John TrumpMark Kelly clinches Democratic Senate nod in Arizona Trump camp considering White House South Lawn for convention speech: reports Longtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran.

The two measures came to the floor less than a month after Trump authorized an airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a move largely lauded by Republicans but criticized by Democrats who questioned the constitutionality of the action.

Four Republicans — Reps. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Progress slow on coronavirus bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Biden VP possible next week; Meadows says relief talks 'miles apart' Hillicon Valley: House panel grills tech CEOs during much anticipated antitrust hearing | TikTok to make code public as it pushes back against 'misinformation' | House Intel panel expands access to foreign disinformation evidence MORE (Fla.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonGOP-Trump fractures on masks open up House punts on FISA, votes to begin negotiations with Senate House cancels planned Thursday vote on FISA MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Progress slow on coronavirus bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Biden VP possible next week; Meadows says relief talks 'miles apart' New HBO documentary lets Gaetz, Massie, Buck offer their take on how to 'drain the swamp' MORE (Ky.) and Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Nano Vision CEO Steve Papermaster says we may need a new TSA-like institution for dealing with future pandemics; Fauci says Trump didn't seek a slowdown on testing The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Hurd says China engaged in global disinformation campaign; US unemployment highest since Great Depression The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Chef José Andrés says most political leaders today are not acting with urgency; Dems crafting 'Rooseveltian' relief package MORE (Ind.) — crossed the aisle to support the bill authored by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaSchiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Progress slow on coronavirus bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Biden VP possible next week; Meadows says relief talks 'miles apart' MORE (D-Calif.) that would block funding for military force in Iran without congressional approval.

ADVERTISEMENT

The measure passed in a 228-175 vote, with GOP proponents of the measure arguing Congress needs to reclaim its constitutional powers.

“Under Article II of the Constitution, the President ALWAYS has the legal authority and moral obligation to respond to attacks and imminent threats. Khanna’s bill worked to make that clear by referencing the War Powers Resolution,” Davidson told The Hill.

Hollingsworth focused on the funding aspect.

“Funding our military operations is an essential Constitutional duty reserved only for Congress," he said in a statement. "Our Commander in Chief should be able to take isolated and decisive action to keep Americans and service members safe, as President Trump has, but only Congress can declare and fund a war."

A spokeswoman for Massie added that the Kentucky Republican “supports President Trump, and his vote today was not about the president.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Our Founding Fathers believed that Congress—not the President—should possess this power," the spokeswoman stated. "Congressman Massie opposes any military action against Iran without a congressional declaration of war.”

Meanwhile, three Democratic lawmakers — Reps. Conor Lamb (Pa.), Ben McAdams (Utah) and Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes The 14 Democrats who broke with their party on coronavirus relief vote House votes to condemn Trump Medicaid block grant policy MORE (Ore.) — voted against Khanna's measure.

The lawmakers' offices did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The House passed a second Iran-related measure, one that would repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF).

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDemocrats introduce bill to repeal funding ban on abortions abroad Democrats hope clash resonates with key bloc: Women OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court strikes down Trump administration's methane rollback | Energy regulators uphold compensation for rooftop solar energy producers | Democrats target Confederate monuments in spending bill MORE (D-Calif.), garnered support from 11 Republicans: Gaetz, Davidson and Massie, as well as Reps. Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Michael Cloud (Texas), Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherCongress has a shot at correcting Trump's central mistake on cybersecurity Cheney battle raises questions about House GOP's future House-passed defense spending bill includes provision establishing White House cyber czar MORE (Wis.), Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyHouse GOP lawmakers urge Senate to confirm Vought Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation MORE (W.Va.), Jamie Herrera Beutler (Wash.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyRepublicans face worsening outlook in battle for House The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden builds big lead in battleground Florida Internal Democratic poll shows tight race in key Texas House district MORE (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertDemocrat Hiral Tipirneni wins Ariz. primary to challenge Rep. David Schweikert Ethics watchdog finds 'substantial' evidence of improper spending by Rep. Sanford Bishop House votes to sanction Schweikert over ethics violations MORE (Ariz.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonMichigan Rep. Fred Upton wins GOP primary The Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks The Hill's Coronavirus Report: iBIO Chairman and CEO Thomas Isett says developing a safe vaccine is paramount; US surpasses 150,000 coronavirus deaths with roughy one death per minute MORE (Mich.).

ADVERTISEMENT

GOP lawmakers who voted in favor of the measure argued the AUMF is outdated and needs to be overhauled.

"It’s past time to start practicing some AUMF hygiene by taking outdated authorizations off the books," Gallagher said in a statement. "The 2002 AUMF is no longer relevant and its repeal should have no material impact on ongoing operations in the Middle East."

“But let me clear: the conversation shouldn’t end today. We in Congress should continue to debate other existing AUMFs and the War Powers Resolution more broadly in order to reclaim this institution’s most important constitutional authority,” he added.

Gaetz, a staunch Trump ally, argued the U.S. needs to take steps to end its involvement in “forever wars.”

“I come to vote my heart. Instead of sending our soldiers to blood-stained sands of the Middle East, let's care for veterans here at home,” he said on the floor. “Instead of ill-fated adventurism, let's put America first. The best time to vote against the Iraq War was 2002. The second best is today."

A number of Republicans took issue with Democrats using an unrelated bill to pass the measures, preventing the GOP from having the opportunity to attempt to alter the bill at the eleventh hour on the floor.

Just two Democrats voted against Lee's measure: Lamb and Rep. Jim CooperJim CooperOvernight Defense: Army now willing to rename bases named after Confederates | Dems demand answers on 'unfathomable' nuke testing discussions | Pentagon confirms death of north African al Qaeda leader Top Democrats demand answers on Trump administration's 'unfathomable' consideration of nuclear testing Taylor Swift slams Trump tweet: 'You have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence?' MORE (Tenn.).

“I was not in Congress when the current AUMFs were passed. I have supported past measures repealing the 2001 and 2002 AUMFs, which also gave Congress time to replace them,” Cooper said in a statement. “This is the most complex region in the world and repealing a law without a replacement strategy is no way to keep our troops or America safe.”