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Doug Collins not interested in national intelligence role despite Trump interest

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsFive things to know about Georgia's Senate runoffs Sunday shows - Health officials warn pandemic is 'going to get worse' Collins urges voters to turn out in Georgia runoffs MORE (R-Ga.) on Friday said that he's not interested in a job as director of national intelligence, despite President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rages against '60 Minutes' for interview with Krebs Cornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Pa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report MORE floating the idea the previous day.

"This is not a job that interests me; at this time it's not one that I would accept because I'm running a Senate race down here in Georgia," Collins told Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo on "Mornings with Maria." "I'm sure the president will pick somebody appropriate for that job."

Trump floated the idea of nominating Collins to reporters on Air Force One on Thursday night. 

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The president on Wednesday named U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell as the acting intelligence chief, replacing Joseph Maguire, who also served in an acting capacity since Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsBiden soars as leader of the free world Lobbying world President Trump: To know him is to 'No' him MORE's departure. The director oversees the nation's intelligence agencies.

A permanent director would need to be confirmed by the Senate.

Collins is challenging Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerFive things to know about Georgia's Senate runoffs Trump: 'I'm ashamed that I endorsed' Kemp in Georgia Ossoff warns McConnell would cause paralysis in federal government if GOP holds Senate MORE (R-Ga.) for her seat in a special election in Georgia. His announcement set off a controversy within the Republican Party and raised questions about Trump's support.

Collins has been one of Trump's staunchest allies and played a key role in defending the president during the House’s impeachment inquiry as the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee.