Doug Collins not interested in national intelligence role despite Trump interest

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsGeorgia makes it easier to get mail-in ballots after delaying primary Overnight Energy: House stimulus aims to stem airline pollution | Environmental measures become sticking point in Senate talks | Progressives propose T 'green stimulus' House bill would ban stock trading by members of Congress MORE (R-Ga.) on Friday said that he's not interested in a job as director of national intelligence, despite President TrumpDonald John TrumpIllinois governor says state has gotten 10 percent of medical equipments it's requested Biden leads Trump by 6 points in national poll Tesla offers ventilators free of cost to hospitals, Musk says MORE floating the idea the previous day.

"This is not a job that interests me; at this time it's not one that I would accept because I'm running a Senate race down here in Georgia," Collins told Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo on "Mornings with Maria." "I'm sure the president will pick somebody appropriate for that job."

Trump floated the idea of nominating Collins to reporters on Air Force One on Thursday night. 

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The president on Wednesday named U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell as the acting intelligence chief, replacing Joseph Maguire, who also served in an acting capacity since Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsWe weren't ready for a pandemic — imagine a crippling cyberattack GOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Experts report recent increase in Chinese group's cyberattacks MORE's departure. The director oversees the nation's intelligence agencies.

A permanent director would need to be confirmed by the Senate.

Collins is challenging Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerGeorgia makes it easier to get mail-in ballots after delaying primary House bill would ban stock trading by members of Congress Loeffler under fire for stock trades amid coronavirus outbreak MORE (R-Ga.) for her seat in a special election in Georgia. His announcement set off a controversy within the Republican Party and raised questions about Trump's support.

Collins has been one of Trump's staunchest allies and played a key role in defending the president during the House’s impeachment inquiry as the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee.