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Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday

Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday
© Greg Nash

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Biden unveils virus plan and urges patience | Fauci says it's 'liberating' working under Biden | House to move quickly on COVID-19 relief Overnight Defense: House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee | Biden to seek five-year extension of key arms control pact with Russia | Two more US service members killed by COVID-19 On The Money: Pelosi says House will move immediately on COVID-19 relief | Biden faces backlash over debt | 900,000 more Americans file for unemployment benefits MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday expressed optimism that the U.S. will eventually elect a female president, despite it being virtually certain that the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee will be a man after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (D-Mass.) withdrew from the race earlier in the day.

Pelosi acknowledged that it won't be this year given the likely choice between the major parties of President TrumpDonald TrumpIran's leader vows 'revenge,' posting an image resembling Trump Former Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Justice Dept. to probe sudden departure of US attorney in Atlanta after Trump criticism MORE and either former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRev. Barber says best way to undercut extremism is with honesty Biden requires international travelers to quarantine upon arrival to US Overnight Defense: House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee | Biden to seek five-year extension of key arms control pact with Russia | Two more US service members killed by COVID-19 MORE or Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Amanda Gorman captures national interest after inauguration performance Woman who made Sanders's mittens says she's sold out MORE (I-Vt.), but maintained that women are making "progress" following the record number of women elected to the House in 2018 and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSamantha Power's Herculean task: Turning a screw with a rubber screwdriver Beau Biden Foundation to deny lobbyist donations, make major donors public Whoopi Goldberg wears 'my vice president' shirt day after inauguration MORE becoming the Democratic nominee four years ago.

"We'll have a woman president. I know we will. I don't know who it is quite yet," Pelosi, the only woman to serve as Speaker to date, said at an event at the Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service moderated by SiriusXM's Julie Mason.

The Democratic presidential field at one point included six women: Warren, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard blasts new House rules on gender neutral language as 'height of hypocrisy' A vaccine, a Burrito and more: 7 lighter, memorable moments from 2020 Growing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting MORE (Hawaii), author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson discusses America's "soulless ethos" Marianne Williamson discusses speaking at People's Party Convention Fewer people watched opening night of Democratic convention compared to 2016 MORE, and Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharA Day in Photos: The Biden Inauguration Senators vet Buttigieg to run Transportation Department Democrats shoot down McConnell's filibuster gambit MORE (Minn.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocrats torn on impeachment trial timing OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: 12 removed from National Guard inauguration security | Austin backs lifting transgender ban Biden Pentagon pick supports lifting transgender military ban MORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris takes up temporary residence at Blair House Amanda Gorman captures national interest after inauguration performance Democrats formally elect Harrison as new DNC chair MORE (Calif.).

Gabbard is the only female candidate who has still not exited the race, but her candidacy remains a long shot and polls in the single digits.

Pelosi suggested that the size of the primary field may have contributed to the female candidates having difficulty consolidating enough support to break through to the top of the pack.

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"This time, the field was so big, the support so spread, perhaps if there hadn't been so many different candidates then a focus on one or two to begin with ... would have been different," Pelosi said.

"But there were a lot of men who didn't make the cut either," Pelosi added.

She suggested that fewer women seem to either promote themselves as potential presidential material or have supporters urging them to run compared to men.

"I haven't necessarily seen that around women. Hillary, yes," she said.

She also took the opportunity to give advice to the assembled Georgetown University students in the audience who might consider running for public office themselves.

"Just build your confidence, but also take stock of what you have to offer, whether you're running for office or running for president."

 
Earlier Thursday, Pelosi said that an “element of misogyny” undermines female presidential candidates like Warren.
 
"I do think there's a certain element of misogyny that is there and some of it isn't really mean spirited. It just isn't their experience," Pelosi said at a press conference in the Capitol.
 
"Many of them will tell you they had a strong mom, they have strong sisters, they have strong daughters. But they have their own insecurities, I guess you would say," she added.