Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday

Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday
© Greg Nash

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi calls Trump's decision to withdraw US from WHO 'an act of extraordinary senselessness' House Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday expressed optimism that the U.S. will eventually elect a female president, despite it being virtually certain that the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee will be a man after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Memo: Trump ratchets up Twitter turmoil Hillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump tweet for 'glorifying violence' | Cruz calls for criminal investigation into Twitter over alleged sanctions violations | Senators urge FTC to investigate TikTok child privacy issues Warren condemns 'horrific' Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests, other senators chime in MORE (D-Mass.) withdrew from the race earlier in the day.

Pelosi acknowledged that it won't be this year given the likely choice between the major parties of President TrumpDonald John TrumpMichael Flynn transcripts reveal plenty except crime or collusion 50 people arrested in Minneapolis as hundreds more National Guard troops deployed Missouri state lawmaker sparks backlash by tweeting 'looters deserve to be shot' MORE and either former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump campaign launches Asian Pacific Americans coalition Biden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Liberal group asks Klobuchar to remove herself from VP consideration because of prosecutorial record MORE or Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe battle of two Cubas Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Ro Khanna Democrats gear up to hit GOP senators on DACA MORE (I-Vt.), but maintained that women are making "progress" following the record number of women elected to the House in 2018 and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump campaign launches Asian Pacific Americans coalition Van Jones: A 'white, liberal Hillary Clinton supporter' can pose a greater threat to black Americans than the KKK Taylor Swift slams Trump tweet: 'You have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence?' MORE becoming the Democratic nominee four years ago.

"We'll have a woman president. I know we will. I don't know who it is quite yet," Pelosi, the only woman to serve as Speaker to date, said at an event at the Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service moderated by SiriusXM's Julie Mason.

The Democratic presidential field at one point included six women: Warren, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (Hawaii), author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson touts endorsements for progressive congressional candidates The Hill's 12:30 Report: Warren becomes latest 2020 rival to back Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to stretch lead in Tuesday contests MORE, and Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharLiberal group asks Klobuchar to remove herself from VP consideration because of prosecutorial record Klobuchar on defense as Floyd death puts spotlight on record Officer involved in George Floyd death charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter MORE (Minn.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate Dems press DOJ over coronavirus safety precautions in juvenile detention centers Senate Democrat introduces bill to protect food supply It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Memo: Trump ratchets up Twitter turmoil Biden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Klobuchar on defense as Floyd death puts spotlight on record MORE (Calif.).

Gabbard is the only female candidate who has still not exited the race, but her candidacy remains a long shot and polls in the single digits.

Pelosi suggested that the size of the primary field may have contributed to the female candidates having difficulty consolidating enough support to break through to the top of the pack.

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"This time, the field was so big, the support so spread, perhaps if there hadn't been so many different candidates then a focus on one or two to begin with ... would have been different," Pelosi said.

"But there were a lot of men who didn't make the cut either," Pelosi added.

She suggested that fewer women seem to either promote themselves as potential presidential material or have supporters urging them to run compared to men.

"I haven't necessarily seen that around women. Hillary, yes," she said.

She also took the opportunity to give advice to the assembled Georgetown University students in the audience who might consider running for public office themselves.

"Just build your confidence, but also take stock of what you have to offer, whether you're running for office or running for president."

 
Earlier Thursday, Pelosi said that an “element of misogyny” undermines female presidential candidates like Warren.
 
"I do think there's a certain element of misogyny that is there and some of it isn't really mean spirited. It just isn't their experience," Pelosi said at a press conference in the Capitol.
 
"Many of them will tell you they had a strong mom, they have strong sisters, they have strong daughters. But they have their own insecurities, I guess you would say," she added.