SPONSORED:

Here are the lawmakers who have self-quarantined as a precaution

Dozens of lawmakers have self-quarantined as a precaution after interacting with people who later tested positive for the coronavirus.

The precautionary steps come as the number of confirmed cases skyrockets in the U.S., leading to schools and nonessential businesses to close as public health officials work to slow the disease.

Below are the lawmakers who have gone into 14-day self-quarantines amid the outbreak. Several have completed their quarantine. The Hill is keeping a separate list of members who have tested positive for coronavirus.

ADVERTISEMENT


Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.) 

Beyer said on March 10 he would self-quarantine after he and his wife interacted with a friend who later tested positive for the virus. Beyer said the Virginia Department of Health informed him that his chances of being infected were very low. 

"I will self-quarantine to ensure that I do not pass on any potential illness to others. In the 10 days since that dinner neither of us has shown symptoms, and we understand that the probability that we have an infection is low,” Beyer said in a statement. 

Rep. Anthony Brindisi (D-N.Y.)

Brindisi announced on March 19 he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with a congressional colleague.

“I have learned that last week I came in contact with another member of Congress who tested positive for COVID-19. Out of an abundance of caution and recommendation of the Attending Physician of the United States Congress, I will self quarantine until next Friday,” he tweeted. “Thankfully, I currently have no symptoms and am in good health. I will be teleworking from my home and will continue fighting to ensure our community has the resources and tools it needs to fight this global pandemic.”

Rep. Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyOvernight Defense: Tucker Carlson comments cause military rage | Capitol guard duty questioned | Vet who served in Marine One unit charged in insurrection Voters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican House Democrats eyeing much broader Phase 3 stimulus MORE (D-Calif.) 

ADVERTISEMENT

Brownley said on March 9 that an individual she met with in Washington, D.C., had tested positive for the coronavirus and that she and some of her staff would self-quarantine out of "abundance of absolute caution."

“I consulted with the Office of Attending Physician, the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention], Ventura County Public Health, and a personal physician experienced in infectious diseases, all of whom said that the risk of exposure to me and my staff is considered very low," Brownley said in a statement.

“However, given the significant number of constituents and other individuals that my staff and I normally have contact with each day when Congress is in session, I have decided to close our DC office for the week," she added.

 

Rep. Matt CartwrightMatthew (Matt) Alton CartwrightHouse Democrats unveil .9 billion bill to boost security after insurrection Garland emphasizes national security, civil rights in budget hearing House Democrats call for paid legal representation in immigration court MORE (D-Pa.)

Cartwright said on March 18 he was self-quarantining after coming in close contact with a family friend who contracted COVID-19.

“Out of an abundance of caution, I began self-quarantining in my home on Sunday as soon as I found out that the friend started showing symptoms consistent with this new virus,” he said in a statement. “I have not developed any symptoms myself since coming into contact with them, but I will remain at home for the next two weeks in order to ensure I do not pass it along to anyone else. The last thing I would want to do is spread this further to my family, friends, constituents, colleagues or staff."

Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeNow that earmarks are back, it's time to ban 'poison pill' riders Parade of 2024 GOP hopefuls court House conservatives Florida Rep. Alcee Hastings dies at 84 MORE (R-Okla.)

Cole released a statement on March 19 he was self-quarantining after learning Rep. Mario Diaz-BalartMario Rafael Diaz-BalartBottom line GOP lawmakers ask Biden administration for guidance on reopening cruise industry The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Biden delivers 100 million shots in 58 days, doses to neighbors MORE (R-Fla.) tested positive for the coronavirus.

“On Wednesday evening, I was informed by the Attending Physician of Congress that my friend Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart has tested positive for COVID-19. While I have no symptoms and feel fine, I was around him for an extended period last week. Out of an abundance of caution, I am following the doctor’s instructions to self-quarantine until March 27,” he said.

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsGeorgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock Poll shows tight GOP primary for Georgia governor The Hill's Morning Report - Census winners and losers; House GOP huddles MORE (R-Ga.)

Collins said on March 9 that he would be under a self-quarantine after coming into contact with an attendee at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in late February who later tested positive for the virus.

"While I feel completely healthy and I am not experiencing any symptoms, I have decided to self-quarantine at my home for the remainder of the 14-day period out of an abundance of caution," Collins said.

Rep. Jason CrowJason CrowPelosi floats Democrat-led investigation of Jan. 6 as commission alternative Finding hope in the hard unfinished work of building and revitalizing our democracy Colorado Democrat: Fear of Trump, desire for power 'overriding' patriotism in some Republicans MORE (D-Colo.)

ADVERTISEMENT

Crow announced on March 17 that he came into contact with a constituent who had contracted COVID-19. Although he hasn’t experienced any symptoms, Crow said he would self-quarantine “with the utmost caution.”

“This is a pandemic and it’s incumbent upon every American to do their part. While at home, I look forward to working full steam ahead to provide the federal resources our community needs to address this crisis,” he said.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBiden tries to erase Trump's 'America First' on world stage Cotton, Pentagon chief tangle over diversity training in military GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot MORE (R-Texas)

Cruz announced on March 8 that he would self-quarantine at his home in Texas after interacting with the same CPAC attendee who crossed paths with Collins.

"I briefly interacted with an individual who is currently symptomatic and has tested positive for COVID-19. That interaction consisted of a brief conversation and a handshake," Cruz said in a statement, adding that his brief interaction with the individual "does not meet the CDC criteria for self-quarantine."

He said he would remain at his home "out of an abundance of caution."

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Rep. Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsDemocratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run Is nonpartisan effectiveness still possible? Biden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure MORE (D-Kan.)

Davids said on March 19 that she was self-quarantining after coming in contact with a congressional colleague who tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I’m thankfully feeling well and have had not experienced any symptoms. The Attending Physician said that I’m at very low risk for contracting COVID-19, as are the people I’ve interacted with recently. But as I’ve said before, we all have a role to play in reducing the spread of this virus, and that means self-quarantining when appropriate,” she said.

Rep. Drew FergusonAnderson (Drew) Drew FergusonGOP frustration with Liz Cheney 'at a boiling point' Tornado leaves at least 1 dead in Newnan, Georgia GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (R-Ga.)

Ferguson tweeted on March 18 he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with Diaz-Balart, who tested positive for the coronavirus. Although Ferguson had no symptoms, he said he would work from home until the 14-day period is over.

“Today, the Attending Physician of the United States Congress informed me that I was in contact with a member of Congress on March 13th that has since tested positive for COVID-19. After heeding the advice of the President, Governor Kemp and at the direction of the House physician, I will self-quarantine until March 27th,” he tweeted.

Rep. Lizzie Fletcher (D-Texas)

ADVERTISEMENT

Fletcher said on March 26 saying she would self-quarantine after experiencing flu-like symptoms, including a high fever.

“Representing Texas’ Seventh Congressional District and making sure our community has the resources it needs to combat coronavirus together is my highest priority. I will continue to work from home, as I have been, advocating for the needs of our community and working to solve problems with my colleagues in Congress and our partners here at home,” she said.

Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzOutrage grows as Justice seeks to contain subpoena fallout Gaetz, under investigative cloud, questions FBI director House Judiciary releases McGahn testimony on Trump MORE (R-Fla.) 

Gaetz, who also came into contact with the same CPAC attendee who interacted with Collins and Cruz, announced on March 9 that he would self-quarantine.

"While the Congressman is not experiencing symptoms, he received testing today and expects results soon," his office said in a statement. "Under doctor's usual precautionary recommendations, he'll remain self-quarantined until the 14-day period expires this week."

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R-Colo.)

Gardner said on March 17 that he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with a constituent who later tested positive for COVID-19.

"While I am not showing any symptoms at this time, I have made the decision to self-quarantine out of an abundance of caution with an effective date of March 11 at the recommendation of the Tri-County Health Department," he said in a statement.

Rep. Vicente Gonzalez (D-Texas)

Gonzalez announced on March 19 that he was self-quarantining after coming in contact with another member of Congress who tested positive for COVID-19. He did not name the fellow lawmaker, but he later tested negative for coronavirus.

“I am thankful to report that I have taken the COVID-19 test and the results were negative,” he said in a statement. “While I have tested negative, I will continue to follow the advice of medical experts and maintain social distancing practices as I work on behalf of the 15th District of Texas.”

Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarOn The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP Trump looms large over fractured Arizona GOP 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 MORE (R-Ariz.) 

Gosar said on March 8 that he and several members of his staff were “officially under self-quarantine” after coming into contact with the CPAC attendee who tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I am announcing that I, along with 3 of my senior staff, are officially under self-quarantine after sustained contact at CPAC with a person who has since been hospitalized with the Wuhan Virus," he tweeted.

Rep. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerOmar feuds with Jewish Democrats House moderates unveil .25T infrastructure plan Democrats debate shape of new Jan. 6 probe MORE (D-N.J.)

Gottheimer released a statement on March 24 saying he was self-quarantining after attending a press conference with a person who later tested positive for the coronavirus. He was advised to get tested despite being asymptomatic. 

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate confirms Garland's successor to appeals court Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema GOP senators applaud Biden for global vaccine donation plans MORE (R-S.C.)

Graham announced on March 15 he tested negative for coronavirus after self-quarantining due to potential exposure. He isolated himself after a visit to President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ asks Supreme Court to revive Boston Marathon bomber death sentence, in break with Biden vow Biden looking to build momentum for Putin meeting DOJ tells media execs that reporters were not targets of investigations MORE’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, where a Brazilian politician was present and later tested positive for the virus.

"I was just informed by Dr. Moynihan, the head of the House Physicians Office, that my coronavirus test was NEGATIVE,” Graham tweeted. "I’m very grateful and like everyone else will follow the best practices to stay negative. I look forward to getting back to work with my Senate colleagues and President Trump to contain this virus and stabilize our economy.”

Rep. Kendra HornKendra Suzanne HornWhy does Rep. Johnson oppose NASA's commercial human landing system? The US's investment in AI is lagging, we have a chance to double it What should Biden do with NASA and the Artemis Program? MORE (D-Okla.)

Horn said on March 19 she was “going into a precautionary two-week self-quarantine” after learning Rep. Ben McAdams (D-Utah) tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I will continue my work to deliver answers and resources to Oklahomans. We are all in this together,” she tweeted.

Rep. Andy Kim (D-N.J.)

Kim announced on March 19 he was self-quarantining after coming in contact with a congressional colleague who tested positive for COVID-19. A few days later, Kim announced he tested negative for the disease.

“I’ve seen first-hand the stress of waiting for test results, and it shows how absolutely important it is that everyone who needs a test has access,” he said in a statement. “My number one priority is giving our frontline health care and emergency workers the tools they need to combat this virus.”

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot Matt Stoller says cheerleading industry shows why antitrust laws are 'insufficient' Senate chaos: Johnson delays exit as votes pushed to Friday MORE (R-Utah)

Lee announced on March 22 that he would self-quarantine after coming into contact with Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulFauci to Chelsea Clinton: The 'phenomenal amount of hostility' I face is 'astounding' GOP's attacks on Fauci at center of pandemic message Fox host claims Fauci lied to Congress, calls for prosecution MORE (R-Ky.), who had tested positive for coronavirus.

“Upon learning that my colleague Sen. Paul tested positive for COVID-19, I consulted the Attending Physician of the U.S. Congress Dr. Harding. He advised me that because I have no symptoms or other risk factors, a COVID-19 test was not warranted," Lee said. "However, given the timing, proximity, and duration of my exposure to Sen. Paul, he directed me to self-quarantine for 14 days."

Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.)

Luján said on March 16 he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with a person who later tested positive for the coronavirus. Although he didn’t experience symptoms, Luján was advised to remain isolated.

“Today, I announced plans to self-quarantine after coming into contact with an individual who was at the time asymptomatic but later tested positive for COVID-19,” he tweeted. “I am exhibiting no symptoms and I am advised by health officials that I am at a very low probability for infection.”

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsBiden's no-drama White House chief Ex-Trump aide Meadows pushed DOJ to probe multiple election theories: report Trump working with Gingrich on policy agenda: report MORE (R-N.C.)

A spokesman for Meadows said on March 9 the congressman "was advised... that he may have come in contact with" the CPAC attendee who later tested positive for the virus.

"Out of an abundance of caution, Meadows received testing which came back negative," his spokesman said. "While he’s experiencing zero symptoms, under doctors’ standard precautionary recommendations, he'll remain at home until the 14 day period expires this Wednesday."

Rep. Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreDemocrats offer bill to encourage hiring of groups hard-hit by pandemic Shining a light on COINTELPRO's dangerous legacy Lawmakers urge IRS to boost outreach about tax credits for low-income Americans MORE (D-Wis.)

Moore said on March 16 she was self-quarantining after learning she came in contact with a person who contracted COVID-19. Although she didn’t show any symptoms, Moore said she was remaining isolated “to protect others from potential exposure.”

“Last night, I was informed that someone I came into contact with on March 8th tested positive for COVID-19. I didn't physically contact this individual and I consulted with the Office of the Attending Physician, who informed me that my risk for contracting COVID-19 is low,” she tweeted.

Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonBipartisan lawmakers press Biden to 'immediately' evacuate Afghans who helped US forces Gosar is the Republican that Democrats want to avoid Labor secretary faces questions from Democrats in police chief controversy MORE (D-Mass.)

Moulton said on March 25 he was self-quarantining because he has symptoms of COVID-19, including a fever and chest tightness.

"As a result, and out of an abundance of caution, I will follow my doctors’ direction and continue to stay home and self-quarantine until I hit seven days after my symptoms started to improve and I do not have a fever for 72 hours. Unless my symptoms take a turn for the worse, that would be this Saturday," he said in a statement.

Rep. Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyDemings raises Democrats' hopes in uphill fight to defeat Rubio Florida state senator announces bid for Demings's House seat The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - One year later — has George Floyd's killing changed the world? MORE (D-Fla.)

Murphy tweeted on March 18 that she was self-quarantining after interacting with a congressional colleague who tested positive for the coronavirus.

“On the advice of the Attending Physician of the U.S. Congress and out of an abundance of caution, I will be self-quarantining until Friday, March 27, 2020. At this moment, I am thankfully experiencing no symptoms and remain in good health,” she said.

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.)

Porter announced on March 25 that she had experienced cold-like symptoms, including fatigue and a fever, and would be self-quarantining while awaiting the results of a coronavirus test.

"I will remain in self-quarantine until I have the test results back and until directed by my doctor that it is safe for me to leave my home. I am participating by telephone in Congressional business and listening to the concerns of our Orange County community," Porter tweeted, followed by a photo of her wearing a mask.

Rep. Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyHouse Republicans introduce resolution to censure the 'squad' Progressives rally behind Omar while accusing her critics of bias House candidate in Chicago says gun violence prompted her to run MORE (D-Mass.)

Pressley was tested for coronavirus on March 25 after having flu-like symptoms. Although the test came back negative, she is recovering from the flu and will continue to work remotely.

“After experiencing flu like symptoms for several days, I contacted my primary care doctor. As an asthmatic and as someone who had been in contact with a colleague who tested positive for COVID-19, it was determined that I fell into a high risk category. I am relieved to report that I have tested negative for COVID-19,” she said in a statement.

Rep. David PriceDavid Eugene PriceSecret Service: Optics of Trump greeting supporters outside Walter Reed wasn't a factor GOP ramps up attacks on Biden's border wall freeze The US has a significant flooding problem — Congress can help MORE (D-N.C.)

Price tweeted on March 19 that he had come into close contact with a colleague who tested positive for coronavirus and decided to self-quarantine.

“However, as a precautionary measure, I will be self-quarantining and working from home through March 25th. Certain members of my staff will follow the same guidelines. Fortunately, neither I, nor staff members in contact with the member, have experienced any symptoms,” he tweeted.

Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceHouse moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill House GOP campaign arm adds to target list Lawmakers brace for bitter fight over Biden tax plan MORE (D-N.Y.)

Rice said on March 18 that she was self-quarantining after being exposed to a person who tested positive for coronavirus. Although Rice said she wasn’t experiencing any symptoms, she was advised by her doctor to remain isolated.

“I am beyond thankful for those on the front lines of this crisis, particularly our healthcare workers. And I ask all who are reading this to take me seriously - these are difficult times and it often requires difficult decisions to keep ourselves apart from our loved ones,” she said.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Biden's European trip Pelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals What the Democrats should be doing to reach true bipartisanship MORE (R-Utah)

Romney said on March 24 that he had tested negative for the coronavirus but would continue to self-quarantine.

“Thankfully I’ve tested negative for COVID-19. Nevertheless, guidance from my physician, consistent with the CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] guidelines, requires me to remain in quarantine as the test does not rule out the onset of symptoms during the 14-day period,” he tweeted.

Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseWisconsin state lawmaker compares museum mask policy to Nazi Party Overnight Health Care: Public option plan left out of Biden budget proposal | House Republicans demand congressional probe into COVID-19 origin | Half the total US population have received at least one vaccine dose House Republicans demand congressional probe into COVID-19 origin MORE (R-La.)

Scalise said on March 18 he was self-quarantining after learning Diaz-Balart tested positive for the coronavirus. The two lawmakers came into close contact at a meeting a week earlier.

“I have just been informed that my colleague, Mario Diaz-Balart, tested positive for COVID-19. Since I had an extended meeting with him late last week, out of an abundance of caution, I have decided it would be best to self-quarantine based on the guidance of the Attending Physician of the United State Congress,” Scalise said in a statement.

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists Outrage grows as Justice seeks to contain subpoena fallout Senate Judiciary begins investigation into DOJ lawmaker subpoenas MORE (D-Calif.)

Schiff announced on March 15 that his former staffer had tested positive for the coronavirus. Schiff noted that although he believed the “former staff member likely contracted the virus after leaving the office,” he still requested his staff to telework.

“Throughout this health crisis, I feel that the job of elected officials is to push out the best information possible, listen to the advice of public health professionals and scientists, and be cautious,” Schiff said.

Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.)

Scott announced on March 12 he was self-quarantining after being in the same room as a Brazilian politician who tested positive for COVID-19.

“My decision today to self-quarantine is out of an abundance of caution,” he tweeted. “My priority is the health and safety of all Americans and I will continue working on my plan to combat the virus and protect American families.”

Rep. David SchweikertDavid SchweikertShakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' On The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP DCCC targets Republicans for touting stimulus bill they voted against MORE (R-Ariz.)

Schweikert said on March 15 he would be working remotely after one of his staffers tested positive for COVID-19. He closed both his Washington, D.C., and Scottsdale, Ariz., offices “out of an abundance of caution.”

“Given that I have interacted with the employee who tested positive, I will be working from home until otherwise told by doctors,” he said in a statement.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSanders won't vote for bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan infrastructure deal takes fire from left and right McConnell warns he's willing to intervene in 2022 GOP primaries MORE (R-S.D.)

Thune said he “felt under the weather” on March 25 and missed the Senate vote that approved the $2 trillion coronavirus response bill. He wasn’t experiencing any serious symptoms, but the senator thought he should avoid Capitol Hill.

“I unfortunately had to miss today’s votes – something I’ve rarely done during my time in Congress,” Thune wrote in a press release. “I felt under the weather this morning and, out of an abundance of caution, thought it was the responsible decision to avoid contact with my colleagues on Capitol Hill.”

Rep. Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerMissouri Republicans move to block Greitens in key Senate race Democratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - House GOP drama intensifies; BIden sets new vax goal MORE (R-Mo.)

Wagner said on March 18 saying she was self-quarantining after meeting with a small group of colleagues, with one member who later tested positive for the virus.

“After discussions with the Attending Physician of the United States Congress, and out of an abundance of caution, I will be self-quarantining. While I feel fine and am not exhibiting any symptoms, I will follow the advice of the Attending Physician until cleared,” she said.

Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonBiden offers traditional address in eerie setting Congressional Black Caucus members post selfie celebrating first WH visit in four years Rep. Frederica Wilson shares her famous hat collection with Netflix MORE (D-Fla.)

Wilson told the Miami Herald on March 19 she was self-quarantining after interacting with Diaz-Balart. Although she said she didn’t experience any symptoms, she continued to remain isolated.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthOn The Money: House Democrats line up .5T in spending without budget | GOP takes aim at IRS | House Democrat mulls wealth tax House Democrats to kick off .5 trillion spending process without budget UK appeals to Congress in push for trade deal MORE (D-Ky.)

Yarmuth said on March 15 he was tested for the coronavirus and would be self-quarantining after interacting with an infected person. A day later he posted on Twitter that the results came back negative.

“My #COVID19 test results came back NEGATIVE. I plan to continue working from home and will avoid going out in order to do my part as we all work to practice safe and precautionary distancing to help defeat this pandemic,” he tweeted. 

UPDATED April 1 9:49 a.m.