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Blame game heats up as Senate motion fails

The finger-pointing on Capitol Hill reached a fever pitch Sunday evening, as both sides rushed to blame the other after a Senate motion to move a mammoth coronavirus relief bill failed on the chamber floor.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Unemployment gains lower than expected | Jobs report lights fire under coronavirus relief talks GOP senators back Christian school's push for COVID-19 carve-out Bipartisan governors call on Congress to pass coronavirus relief package MORE (R-Ky.) quickly took to the floor to hammer Democratic leaders, particularly Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Unemployment gains lower than expected | Jobs report lights fire under coronavirus relief talks Hillicon Valley: Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security | Biden says China must play by 'international norms' | House Democrats use Markup app for leadership contest voting Bipartisan governors call on Congress to pass coronavirus relief package MORE (D-Calif.), for what he characterized as petty obstruction that ignores the urgency of the crisis.

"We were doing a good job of coming together until this morning, when the Speaker showed up — we don't have a Speaker in the Senate, that's in the House — and when the leader [Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBipartisan governors call on Congress to pass coronavirus relief package Pelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms MORE (D-N.Y.)] and the Speaker came in [they] blew everything up," an agitated McConnell, his face flushed, said walking off the Senate floor.

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Democrats quickly countered with accusations that it was McConnell who had abandoned the negotiations the night before, when the Senate leader announced that Republicans would begin drafting the massive stimulus package before Democrats had endorsed it.

"There was a good spirit of negotiation into early last night. And right about 8 o'clock, our side sensed a sort of change in attitude, an unwillingness to give and negotiate, for reasons we don't fully understand," said Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Kerry says Paris climate deal alone 'is not enough' | EPA halts planned Taiwan trip for Wheeler| EPA sued over rule extending life of toxic coal ash ponds Overnight Energy: Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' | GM reverses on Trump, exits suit challenging California's tougher emissions standards | United Nations agency says greenhouse gas emissions accumulating despite lockdown decline GSA transition delay 'poses serious risk' to Native Americans, Udall says MORE (D-Del.).

The tense back-and-forth came moments after Democrats blocked a procedural motion to advance Congress's third round of emergency relief — a package approaching $2 trillion — in response to the global coronavirus pandemic, which has devastated markets, sparked mass layoffs and ravaged businesses large and small across the country.

Democrats have raised a long list of objections to Republicans' proposal, saying the bill does too little to protect the unemployed, feed the hungry, subsidize states and cushion students facing mounds of debt. They're also up in arms over language to provide up to $500 billion in loans and guarantees for corporations, at the sole discretion of the administration.

"It amounts to a blank check for Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin," Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOn The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser GOP blocks effort to make payroll tax deferral optional for federal workers Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry MORE (D-Md.) told MSNBC Sunday night. "That's outrageous, and that's not going to happen."

Senate Democrats united to block the bill — a 47 to 47 vote — which fell far short of the 60 votes Republicans needed to advance the package.

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The absences within the 100-member Senate reflected the grim new reality as lawmakers scramble to infuse the sinking economy with federal dollars: Five senators are under quarantine as the debate evolves, four of them as a precautionary measure and the fifth, Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Lawmakers release compromise defense bill in defiance of Trump veto threat | Senate voting next week on blocking UAE arms sale | Report faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' in military plane crashes Senate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale McConnell in tough position as House eyes earmark return MORE (R-Ky.), because he's contracted the virus.

McConnell quickly reversed his vote, allowing him to revisit the measure quickly if negotiators, who continued their talks Sunday evening, break the impasse. But he wasted no time accusing Democrats of exacerbating both the economic damage and the public health threat in the meantime.

"I want everybody to understand who's responsible for slowing this down," he told a handful of reporters. "And we'd better get an outcome, we better get it by tomorrow, or the American people are going to know who to blame."

Democrats lashed back, accusing McConnell and Republicans of pushing a partisan bill that leans lopsidedly toward corporations over small businesses and the low- and middle-income workers who are most immediately affected.

"He knows darn well that for this bill to pass, it needs both Democratic and Republican support," Schumer said on the floor after the vote.

A Democratic aide later piled on.

"In the midst of a pandemic, Senator McConnell’s partisan stunt today was a real disservice to the American people," the aide said. "Democrats sat and met with Republicans in good faith over the weekend trying to hammer out a real bipartisan compromise, only to see all that work scrapped and replaced with a $500 billion slush fund with no accountability, no money for states, and no real help for hospitals."

The debate is reaching a crucial point after several days of negotiations between Senate leaders, committee heads and White House officials in search of a breakthrough on the nearly $2 trillion package. The number of coronavirus cases in the United States topped 33,000 on Sunday, while the number of deaths rose to 417, according to a tally kept by Johns Hopkins University. And a growing number of businesses have been forced to shut their doors, prompting a spike in jobless claims and rampant fears about the ultimate economic toll.

While the House has been on recess for more than a week, Pelosi has been working closely with Schumer as the talks have progressed, and she joined the discussion directly — along with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Congress inches closer to virus relief deal McCarthy woos Freedom Caucus with eye on Speakership House GOP uses procedural tool to protest proxy voting MORE (R-Calif.) — at a meeting in McConnell's office Sunday morning.

It didn't go well.

After roughly an hour, Pelosi left the gathering and told reporters that the sides remained far apart, and House Democrats would forge ahead with previous plans to introduce their own stimulus legislation.

"Hopefully it will be compatible with what they discuss on the Senate side,” she said.

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Still, there were glimmers of hope that all sides could reach a deal by Monday, perhaps eliminating the need for Pelosi to reconvene the House amid growing lawmaker concerns about public travel and mass gatherings.

"We just need to come back and find that spirit that existed before 8 o'clock last night," Carper said. "If we could find common ground [on the first two bills], and just use that spirit of consultation and cooperation, we'll get through this."

Having a Senate colleague test positive for the virus has only fueled the urgency to get it done.

"I do think this diagnosis today, that Sen. Rand Paul has tested positive, is going to have an impact on how many senators are willing to stay here all night, all weekend, all next week and hammer out the details of this bill," Sen. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms Overnight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate MORE (D-Del.) told MSNBC.

Jordain Carney contributed.