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Trump lends support to swing district Republicans

Trump lends support to swing district Republicans
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign slams Facebook after thousands of ads blocked by platform's pre-election blackout Mnuchin says he learned of Pelosi's letter to him about stimulus talks 'in the press' Harris to travel to Texas Friday after polls show tie between Trump, Biden MORE on Friday lent his support to several Republicans running in swing House districts to aid the GOP’s efforts to retake ground in the lower chamber.

Trump announced endorsements for a number of Republicans in a late Friday night tweetstorm, backing at least six House candidates who are running in districts that are top GOP targets.

The candidates are mostly running in Pennsylvania and Iowa, two swing states that will be crucial to Trump’s own race this November. The president also endorsed Republican Karen HandelKaren Christine HandelHouse Democrats' campaign arm reserves .6M in ads in competitive districts Black Lives Matter movement to play elevated role at convention QAnon backer Marjorie Taylor Greene wins Georgia GOP runoff MORE, who lost a swing seat in the Atlanta suburbs in 2018 that she is running to retake this year.

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“We need @KarenHandel back in Congress to fight for the incredible people of Georgia! She is a tremendous advocate for our Military, Vets, Border Security and the Second Amendment. Karen has my Complete and Total Endorsement,” Trump tweeted Friday. 

In Iowa, Trump endorsed Ashely Hinson and David YoungDavid Edmund YoungDemocrats lead in 3 of 4 Iowa House races: poll Eric Idle threatens to sue GOP committee over use of Monty Python song in ad Trump: DeJoy should be removed if it 'can be proven that he did something wrong' MORE, who are running in Iowa’s 1st and 3rd Congressional Districts, respectively. The GOP ceded both seats in 2018 to Abby FinkenauerAbby Lea FinkenauerTrump looms over Ernst's tough reelection fight in Iowa Democrats lead in 3 of 4 Iowa House races: poll Centrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote MORE and Cindy AxneCindy AxneTrump looms over Ernst's tough reelection fight in Iowa Democrats lead in 3 of 4 Iowa House races: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, first lady in quarantine after testing positive for COVID-19 MORE, whose districts are both top priorities for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC).   

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The Cook Political Report, a nonpartisan election handicapper, rates both seats as toss ups.

In Pennsylvania, Trump backed Lisa Scheller, Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryHouse Republicans ask Amtrak CEO for information on Biden's train trips Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it MORE and Sean Parnell in the state’s 7th, 10th and 17th Congressional Districts. Scheller and Parnell are running to unseat Democrats, while Perry is fighting for reelection in a seat that is expected to be hotly contested by Democrats.

Scheller’s race is rated “lean Democratic,” Perry’s race is rated a “toss up” and Parnell’s race is rated “likely Democratic.”

Republicans are still smarting from their loss of the House in 2018, when a blue wave in suburban districts across the country delivered the chamber for Democrats. While the GOP is not the favorite to win back the House this year, the party received promising news when Republican Mike Garcia won a Democratic-held California district in a special election earlier this month, the first time the GOP has flipped a seat in the state since 1998.

Democrats contend that the circumstances surrounding the special election, including low turnout, will not translate into November, and that they anticipate winning back the seat in the general election. 

Trump is known to relish the role of campaigner-in-chief, appearing often on the campaign trail in 2018 for Republicans in competitive congressional races. However, his campaign efforts both for himself and down-ballot contenders has largely been relegated to the digital realm in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.