Amash readying legislation allowing victims to sue officers

Amash readying legislation allowing victims to sue officers
© Greg Nash

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashDemocrats fear US already lost COVID-19 battle Michigan candidate's daughter urges people not to vote for him in viral tweet Can Trump break his 46 percent ceiling? MORE (L-Mich.) plans to introduce a bill that would end the prohibition of suing police officers, the first major national legislative response to the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died in Minneapolis police custody.

Amash, who recently switched his party affiliation to Libertarian, tweeted Sunday that the bill would "correct" what he claims to be an error made by the Supreme Court when it established the doctrine of qualified immunity. Qualified immunity protects government officials, including police officers, from lawsuits alleging they violated a plaintiff's rights unless a “clearly established” right has been violated.

In practice, the doctrine blocks most lawsuits against individual police officers.

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"This week, I am introducing the Ending Qualified Immunity Act to eliminate qualified immunity and restore Americans’ ability to obtain relief when police officers violate their constitutionally secured rights," he wrote.

"The brutal killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police is merely the latest in a long line of incidents of egregious police misconduct," Amash continued. "This pattern continues because police are legally, politically, and culturally insulated from consequences for violating the rights of the people whom they have sworn to serve. That must change so that these incidents of brutality stop happening."

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It's unclear how much support the bill will have, but aides to Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarAnalysis: 23 million families could face eviction by October due to pandemic Tucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue MORE (D-Minn.) indicated to Reuters that it would have her support when Amash introduces it Thursday.

Police conduct has been roundly criticized in recent days following bystander video that surfaced of Floyd's death. The footage showed a former officer, Derek Chauvin, placing his knee on Floyd's neck for several minutes despite Floyd's constant plea for air.

Chauvin has since been charged with third-degree murder for his actions, while activists and some lawmakers have called for three other officers fired over the incident to be charged as well.

Elsewhere in the U.S., police response to protests over Floyd's death in major cities has also been criticized, including video of officers appearing to ram a crowd of protesters with a police cruiser in New York City.

New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Chris Christie says Trump team wasn't aggressive enough early in COVID-19 crisis; Tensions between White House, Fauci boil over Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Chris Christie Cuomo poster depicts Trump as 'man in the moon' watching coronavirus pandemic MORE (D) addressed that video at a press conference, explaining that he directed the state's attorney general to investigate the incident.

"I'm telling [New York City officials] that if the review looks at those videos and finds improper conduct, there will be ramifications," Cuomo said at a press conference according to NorthJersey.com.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. on 6/3/2020.