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Tlaib wins Michigan Democratic primary

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibProgressive lawmakers call for United Nations probe into DHS 'human rights abuses' Ocasio-Cortez hits Trump for 'disrespect' over calling her AOC during debates Ocasio-Cortez draws hundreds of thousands of viewers on Twitch livestream MORE (D-Mich.) successfully defended her seat in Michigan’s 13th District on Tuesday, fending off a primary challenge from former Rep. Brenda Jones (D-Mich.). 

The Associated Press called the race for the incumbent on Wednesday morning. Tlaib won 66 percent of the votes cast, with 87 percent of precincts reporting. 

“Voters sent a clear message that they’re done waiting for transformative change, that they want an unapologetic fighter who will take on the status quo and win," Tlaib said in a statement on Wednesday.

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"We have a resounding mandate to put people before profits. Let it be known that in the 13th District, just like in communities across our country, we are done with establishment politics that put corporations first," she continued. "If I was considered the most vulnerable member of the Squad, I think it’s safe to say the Squad is here to stay, and it’s only getting bigger." 

Tlaib was seen as the front-runner going into the primary given her lead in fundraising and in the polls. A Target-Insight survey released last month showed the lawmaker with 52 percent support, while Jones trailed at 24 percent support.

In fundraising, Tlaib raised $777,000 during the second quarter, bringing her fundraising total to $2.9 million. Jones, on the other hand, raised $98,000 during the same period, bringing her total to $140,000.

However, Jones defeated Tlaib in the race to replace former Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersBiden's immigration plan has serious problems Tlaib wins Michigan Democratic primary Tlaib holds lead in early vote count against primary challenger MORE (D-Mich.) in the district in 2018, and was outspent by her in that cycle as well. Jones served in Congress for just over a month.

Tlaib later defeated Jones in the six-way primary to replace Conyers and Jones when the new term was due to start in 2019. 

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The progressive congresswoman gained national attention after she was elected. She is known for being a member of the self-described “squad” of four progressive congresswomen also elected in 2018: Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump strips protections for Tongass forest, opening it to logging | Interior 'propaganda' video and tweets may violate ethics laws, experts say | Democrats see Green New Deal yielding gains despite GOP attacks Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' Ocasio-Cortez: 'Trump is the racist visionary, but McConnell gets the job done' MORE (D-N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOcasio-Cortez: Republicans don't believe Democrats 'have the stones to play hardball' Progressive lawmakers call for United Nations probe into DHS 'human rights abuses' Ocasio-Cortez hits Trump for 'disrespect' over calling her AOC during debates MORE (D-Minn.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyProgressive lawmakers call for United Nations probe into DHS 'human rights abuses' Ocasio-Cortez hits Trump for 'disrespect' over calling her AOC during debates Democrats unveil bill to reduce police violence against people with mental illness MORE (D-Mass.).

Tlaib made headlines shortly after she was sworn into office when she called for President TrumpDonald John TrumpHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Police called after Florida moms refuse to wear face masks at school board meeting about mask policy Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline MORE’s impeachment, telling supporters “we’re gonna impeach the motherf---er.” 

She received notable endorsements from both wings of the Democratic Party ahead of the primary, including progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOcasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' What a Biden administration should look like Ocasio-Cortez: 'Trump is the racist visionary, but McConnell gets the job done' MORE (I-Vt.) and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Trump should accept election results 'like a man' The spectre of pension failures haunts this election Microsoft: Iranian hacking group targeting attendees of major international security conferences MORE (D-Calif.). 

Jones touted her longstanding connections within the Detroit community, pointing to her experience as a member and president of the city council. She was also seen as representative of the city’s large Black population, receiving endorsements from a number of city council members and several prominent Black ministers, including Second Ebenezer Church’s Bishop Edgar Vann.

Tlaib's victory was one of many for progressive candidates in Tuesday's primaries. Progressive Cori Bush won her primary against longtime Rep. Wm. Lacy ClayWilliam (Lacy) Lacy ClayWomen of color flex political might Five things we learned from this year's primaries Progressives aim for big night in Massachusetts MORE (D-Mo.), scoring a stunning upset. Additionally, Missouri voters voted to approve Medicaid expansion, despite objections from Republican leaders in the state.