Biden unites Democrats — for now

Democrats are bracing for an all-out fight over their agenda if former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Fox News poll: Biden ahead of Trump in Nevada, Pennsylvania and Ohio MORE wins the White House in November.

Even as Democrats rallied behind Biden during the four-day virtual convention, his ascendancy to the nomination has only paused the deep divisions within the party — not gotten rid of them altogether.

Biden and Democratic leaders in Congress are likely to face vast disagreements in naming their top priorities, high-profile splits on key policy issues such as health care and climate change, and an emboldened progressive wing eager to push the party further to the left.

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"We're going to come together to defeat Trump, and the day after Biden is elected, we're going to have a serious debate about the future of this country," Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump faces backlash after not committing to peaceful transition of power Bernie Sanders: 'This is an election between Donald Trump and democracy' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump stokes fears over November election outcome MORE (I-Vt.), Biden's top challenger in the 2020 primary, told "The Daily Show" this week.

A similar message was delivered in the midst of the convention when liberal firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOn The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline McCarthy says there will be a peaceful transition if Biden wins Anxious Democrats amp up pressure for vote on COVID-19 aid MORE (D-N.Y.) endorsed Sanders as the party’s nominee. The gesture was a formality — Ocasio-Cortez is supporting Biden in November and was asked by the Democratic National Committee to endorse Sanders only to satisfy official convention protocols.

Yet in doing so, Ocasio-Cortez highlighted Sanders's signature fight for economic justice, including efforts to install universal health care and guaranteed higher education — items opposed by many party centrists and excluded from the Democrats’ 2020 platform. Her message made crystal clear that Biden was the fallback choice in the eyes of many liberals — favored over President TrumpDonald John TrumpSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence probe Pelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Trump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance MORE but not favored outright — and that they’ll be fighting tooth and nail for Sanders-style policy reforms if Democrats win the White House.

Those tensions were on preview this week when Ocasio-Cortez challenged the head of Biden’s transition team, who predicted that Democrats would be “limited” in their agenda because of the debt racked up by Trump and Republicans with their 2017 tax cuts.

“This is extremely concerning. The pantry is absolutely not bare,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted. “We need massive investment in our country or it will fall apart.”

The awkward intraparty dynamics will force Biden and congressional Democratic leaders to perform a delicate dance, constantly gauging how far left they can go to satisfy progressives without alienating a host of moderate, battleground-state Democrats.

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Veterans of Capitol Hill said it’ll be no easy task.

“I can’t sugarcoat it: Sure, the party is united at this point in time, but the rubber is going to hit the road if and when we pick up the Senate and the White House as well,” said Jim Manley, a top aide to former Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Supreme Court vacancy — yet another congressional food fight Trump seeks to turn around campaign with Supreme Court fight On The Trail: Battle over Ginsburg replacement threatens to break Senate MORE (D-Nev.).

“The legislating, the governing, is going to become a lot more difficult,” he added. “It’s almost in the category of ‘be careful of what you wish for’ because there’s a long list of pent-up demands within many in the party.”

Biden beat out a crowded field that included high-profile progressives such as Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Democratic senators ask inspector general to investigate IRS use of location tracking service MORE (D-Mass.) to win the party’s nomination. But he’s unlikely to get much of a honeymoon from his left flank, which, while focused on beating Trump, is already strategizing about policy priorities.

"There's going to be a little bit of internal caucus battle here between moderates and progressives, and that's going to happen in both the House and the Senate," said Angel Padilla, national policy director for the progressive group Indivisible.

Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, said they want Democrats to enact "big systemic reforms" that "shake up power dynamics" as well as additional items including statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., and reforming the Supreme Court.

"What it can't mean is lowest-common-denominator legislating," he added on the pledges for unity.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Trump signs largely symbolic pre-existing conditions order amid lawsuit MORE (D-Caif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' 3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing Cruz blocks amended resolution honoring Ginsburg over language about her dying wish MORE (D-N.Y.) are promising to pursue an ambitious agenda but also one that could unite their party.

Pelosi, during an interview with David AxelrodDavid AxelrodThe Memo: Warning signs flash for Trump on debates GOP hunts for leverage in revived COVID-19 talks Pelosi says there shouldn't be any debates between Biden and Trump MORE, outlined a laundry list of issues she views as a starting point for Democrats under a Biden presidency, including ethics and election reform, infrastructure, immigration, climate change, and drug costs. 

All of those proposals were passed through the House this election cycle with virtually unanimous Democratic support. But Republican opposition — combined with the power of the filibuster — means it’s highly unlikely that most of those bills could move through the Senate to Biden’s desk, even if Democrats flip the upper chamber to seize a slim majority, without the destruction of the filibuster.

Any attempt to drive Biden and congressional leaders to the left could spark backlash from moderates and swing-district lawmakers, who will have a close eye on how voting on a liberal wishlist could reverberate back home. After years of partisan bickering and legislative logjams, centrist Democrats are already calling for a new era of bipartisan cooperation.

Rep. Conor Lamb (Pa.), a Blue Dog Democrat who represents a district around Pittsburgh carried by Trump in 2016, is urging Democrats to reach across the aisle in search of compromises that can actually become law.

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"That's what people want. That's what people have said to me for the last almost three years. Is there any way we can get past these divisions?" Lamb told CNN.

"Their advice was always 'Look, work with the other side if you can. We don't want to hear you talking about them like they are a different tribe or your enemy,'" he added.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Klobuchar3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing Social media platforms put muscle into National Voter Registration Day Battle lines drawn on precedent in Supreme Court fight MORE (D-Minn.) also used her convention speech to tout Biden’s broad coalition, saying that’s “how we get stuff done.”

Biden came up through the centrist wing of the party during his more than four decades in elected office, angering progressives along the way with positions such as his opposition to “Medicare for All,” his support for the Iraq War and his championing of the 1994 crime bill.

Yet he’s made clear that, to beat Trump, he needs to cobble together a coalition transcending ideology, ranging from wary progressives such as Sanders and Warren to disgruntled Republicans — including former governors, top national security officials and high-profile pundits — who are disenchanted with the direction their party has veered.

And that, liberals say, is where the cooperation should cease.

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“The kumbaya should end there,” Green said. “There’s no doubt that the corporate side of the Democratic Party and Republicans themselves will be trying to get as many seats at the table as they can.”

Progressives are expected to grow their numbers in the House after knocking off Democratic incumbents such as Rep. Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelHouse panel halts contempt proceedings against Pompeo after documents turned over Engel subpoenas US global media chief Michael Pack The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (N.Y.) and Wm. Lacy ClayWilliam (Lacy) Lacy ClayFive things we learned from this year's primaries Progressives aim for big night in Massachusetts Progressives look to unseat top Democrat in Massachusetts primary MORE (Mo.) in the primaries, which they hope will give them more influence.

“If we actually get to 15 to 20, which it looks like we will, that is a potent force. I mean, that can help set the agenda for our party,” said Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaThe Hill Interview: Jerry Brown on climate disasters, COVID-19 and Biden's 'Rooseveltian moment' Congress needs to prioritize government digital service delivery DeJoy defends Postal Service changes at combative House hearing MORE (D-Calif.), a first vice chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

Pelosi brushed off a question about whether progressives beating incumbents was awkward for her, noting that she was a “left-wing San Francisco liberal.”

But Pelosi, a pragmatic tactician, has also been careful to protect the moderate “majority makers” who flipped GOP seats in 2018. And she’s warning that Democrats needed a “consensus message" in order to hold on to power.

“We need that vitality, all the vitalities in our party,” she said. “But the fact is, if we’re going to have the majority, there aren’t 218 San Franciscos in the country.”