House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it

The House passed a bipartisan resolution condemning the sprawling QAnon conspiracy theory, though 17 Republican lawmakers voted against the measure in the 371-18 vote. 

The GOP lawmakers voting "no" were Reps. Jodey ArringtonJodey Cook ArringtonMcCarthy pulls GOP picks off House economic panel The case for improving America's research and experimentation tax credit Republicans attack Biden agenda after disappointing jobs report MORE (Texas), Brian Babin (Texas), Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopGOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Westerman tapped as top Republican on House Natural Resources Committee | McMorris Rodgers wins race for top GOP spot on Energy and Commerce | EPA joins conservative social network Parler MORE (Utah), Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksBad week in Trumpland signals hope for American democracy Kinzinger supports Jan. 6 panel subpoenas for Republicans, including McCarthy DOJ declines to back Mo Brooks's defense against Swalwell's riot lawsuit MORE (Ala.), Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court rules that pipeline can seize land from New Jersey | Study: EPA underestimated methane emissions from oil and gas development | Kevin McCarthy sets up task forces on climate, other issues Texas Republicans condemn state Democrats for response to official calling Scott an 'Oreo' Americans have decided to give professionals a chance MORE (Texas), Buddy CarterEarl (Buddy) Leroy CarterSchumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up Trump says Herschel Walker will enter Georgia Senate race Bottom line MORE (Ga.), Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonHouse GOP stages mask mandate protest McCarthy pulls GOP picks off House economic panel Governors' races see flood of pro-Trump candidates MORE (Ohio), Jeff DuncanJeffrey (Jeff) Darren DuncanNoem to travel to South Carolina for early voting event OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court rules that pipeline can seize land from New Jersey | Study: EPA underestimated methane emissions from oil and gas development | Kevin McCarthy sets up task forces on climate, other issues GOP lawmaker demands review over FBI saying baseball shooting was 'suicide by cop' MORE (S.C.), Drew FergusonAnderson (Drew) Drew FergusonSchumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up Families won't be able to afford the basics, here's why Congress needs to fix the broken market for antibiotic development MORE (Ga.), Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it MORE (Texas), Paul GosarPaul Anthony Gosar57 House Republicans back Georgia against DOJ voting rights lawsuit Gosar's siblings pen op-ed urging for his resignation: 'You are immune to shame' Reporter: Gosar's immigration proposal shows lack of 'unifying theme' for GOP opposition MORE (Ariz.), Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingGOP brawls over Trump on eve of first Jan. 6 hearing Pence to visit Iowa to headline event for congressman Former Steve King challenger on rural voters in GOP states: 'They hate Democrats' MORE (Iowa), Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyLobbying world Lobbying world Liz Cheney says McConnell, McCarthy are heads of GOP MORE (Pa.), Ralph NormanRalph Warren NormanTempers flare as some in GOP ignore new House mask mandate Greene, Massie, Norman sue Pelosi over mask fines GOP brawls over Trump on eve of first Jan. 6 hearing MORE (S.C.), Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryPhotos of the Week: Olympic sabre semi-finals, COVID-19 vigil and a loris Trump urged DOJ officials to call election corrupt 'and leave the rest to me' GOP lawmakers demand answers on withheld restitution following Nassar revelation MORE (Pa.), Thomas Tiffany (Wis.) and Daniel WebsterDaniel Alan WebsterHow Donald Rumsfeld helped save the presidency Gun deaths surge in Iowa ahead of loosened handgun restrictions The punctuated sentence of Derek Chauvin MORE (Fla.).

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash warns of turning lawmakers like Cheney into 'heroes' Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Biden: 'Prince Philip gladly dedicated himself to the people of the UK' MORE (L-Mich.), who used to be a Republican, also voted against the resolution. 

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Another GOP lawmaker, Rep. Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisOvernight Health Care: Biden officials says no change to masking guidance right now | Missouri Supreme Court rules in favor of Medicaid expansion | Mississippi's attorney general asks Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade House GOP leaders say vaccine works but shouldn't be mandated Acquiescing to Berlin, emboldening Moscow and squeezing Kyiv: Biden and Nordstream 2 MORE (Md.), voted present. 

President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions The Memo: Left pins hopes on Nina Turner in Ohio after recent defeats Biden administration to keep Trump-era rule of turning away migrants during pandemic MORE has not condemned the QAnon conspiracy, which revolves around the baseless theory that Trump and his allies are working to expose a cabal of Democrats, media figures and celebrities who are running an international child trafficking ring.

As unhinged as the conspiracy is, it has gained steam in conservative circles and several Republicans running for the House this year have backed the theory, including Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, who is expected to win her general election race this November. 

Greene has been praised effusively by Trump and backed by Republican leadership despite her supportive comments about QAnon and a history of racist and anti-Semitic comments.

The measure condemning QAnon was sponsored by Reps. Denver RigglemanDenver RigglemanVirginia Democrats seek to tie Youngkin to Trump's election claims The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Jan. 6 probe, infrastructure to dominate week The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel MORE (R-Va.) and Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiHouse lawmakers push for diplomatic boycott of Beijing Olympics Kean Jr. to run against Malinowski: report The tool we need to expand COVID-19 vaccinations world-wide MORE (D-N.J.). 

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"QAnon and other conspiracy theories and movements that dehumanize people or political groups, incite violence or violent threats and destroy faith and trust in our democratic institutions must be identified, condemned and exposed through facts,” Riggleman told The Hill. 

“The First Amendment is a powerful weapon. Turning that weapon on those who use fantasies as a menacing grift is the responsibility of reasonable citizens, legislators and executives.”

The QAnon theory is considered a serious threat, and has been tied to multiple instances of criminal activity.

Besides Greene, several other House GOP candidates have also expressed openness to the QAnon theory, including Lauren Boebert in Colorado, Burgess Owens in Utah, Mike Cargile and Erin Cruz in California, and Illinois's Theresa Raborn. 

The Freedom Caucus-affiliated House Freedom Fund, for example, has endorsed and directed funding toward Greene, Boebert and Owens.

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Greene and Boebert have both attempted to distance themselves from the theory since winning their primaries. Experts studying QAnon have said while those walk-backs are expected, they'll do little to convince the theory’s adherents that the candidates aren’t on their side.

While most Republicans have clearly condemned the theory, they have also sought to distract from it by pointing to allegations of violence by left-wing activists.

An amendment offered by Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-Ariz.) to include language in the measure condemning violence committed by antifa was voted down in the House Rules Committee.

Antifa, short for anti-fascist, refers to a loose collection of primarily leftist activists. The movement has been a preferred target of Trump as the source of violence and property destruction at anti-police brutality protests despite no evidence linking the two.

FBI Director Christopher Wray in a hearing earlier this month pointed out that the term refers to an ideology, not an organization. QAnon, on the other hand, has been directly linked to violence.

The resolution adopted Thursday cites numerous examples of violence and criminal activity seen from QAnon supporters and calls for federal law enforcement and the FBI to allocate more resources toward countering conspiracy-driven extremism. 

The FBI has labeled the conspiracy theory a potential domestic terrorism threat, and it has been linked to kidnapping, terrorism and murder.

An earlier version of this story misstated the number of GOP lawmakers who voted no. It was 17 Republicans, and one Libertarian member.