SPONSORED:

Ocasio-Cortez: Republicans don't believe Democrats 'have the stones to play hardball'

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezKamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE (D-N.Y.)  took to Twitter late Monday to call for the expansion of the Supreme Court as Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettGovernors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Feinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight McConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report MORE was sworn in as a justice, with the progressive first-term lawmaker arguing that Republicans don’t believe Democrats “have the stones to play hardball like they do. “

“Expand the court,” the congresswoman wrote in response to the 52-48 Senate vote Monday evening to confirm Barret after a weeks-long partisan fight. 

“Republicans do this because they don’t believe Dems have the stones to play hardball like they do,” Ocasio-Cortez added in a follow-up tweet. “And for a long time they’ve been correct. But do not let them bully the public into thinking their bulldozing is normal but a response isn’t."

ADVERTISEMENT

“There is a legal process for expansion,” she added. 

Democratic Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarBiden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far GOP congresswoman-elect wants to form Republican 'Squad' called 'The Force' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden eyes new leadership at troubled public lands agency | House progressives tout their growing numbers in the chamber at climate rally | Trump administration pushes for rollback of Arctic offshore drilling regulations MORE (Minn.), a fellow "squad" member, retweeted Ocasio-Cortez’s messages Monday evening. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“Remember that Republicans have lost 6 of the last 7 popular votes, but have appointed 6 of the last 9 justices," she wrote. “By expanding the court we fix this broken system and have the court better represent the values of the American people.” 

The addition of more justices to the Supreme Court, as well as the end to the Senate filibuster, has been gaining increasing support among Democrats. 

Sen. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Biden rolls out national security team Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks MORE (D-Del.), an ally of Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation US records 2,300 COVID-19 deaths as pandemic rises with holidays MORE, said earlier this month that he is open to expanding the Supreme Court. 

And Sen. Angus KingAngus KingLeadership changes at top cyber agency raise national security concerns Top cybersecurity official ousted by Trump Republicans start turning the page on Trump era MORE (I-Maine), long viewed as a key swing vote on the issue, hinted during the Senate's debate that he was open to expanding the Supreme Court, noting that the number of justices is not inscribed in the Constitution. 

“Oh, no! Somebody is talking about breaking the rules and packing the court. Well, of course, Article 3 of the Constitution doesn't establish how many members of the Supreme Court there should be,” King said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

"I don't want to pack the court. I don't want to change the number. I don't want to have to do that. But if all of this rule breaking is taking place, what does the majority expect?" he added.

Senate Democrats warned of intense pushback over the GOP push to confirm Barrett just before Election Day, with many pointing out a double standard following Senate Republicans’ refusal to provide a hearing for former President Obama’s pick, Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandFeinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight McConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report Feinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee MORE, in 2016. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) said Monday night that Republicans may eventually regret their decision to push to confirm President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE’s latest nominee. 

"The Republican majority is lighting its credibility on fire. ... The next time the American people give Democrats a majority in this chamber, you will have forfeited the right to tell us how to run that majority," Schumer said. 

"My colleagues may regret this for a lot longer than they think," he added.