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Ocasio-Cortez: Republicans don't believe Democrats 'have the stones to play hardball'

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHarris attends DC Pride rally Simmering Democratic tensions show signs of boiling over Out-of-touch Democrats running scared of progressives MORE (D-N.Y.)  took to Twitter late Monday to call for the expansion of the Supreme Court as Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettSupreme Court confounding its partisan critics Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Gorsuch, Thomas join liberal justices in siding with criminal defendant MORE was sworn in as a justice, with the progressive first-term lawmaker arguing that Republicans don’t believe Democrats “have the stones to play hardball like they do. “

“Expand the court,” the congresswoman wrote in response to the 52-48 Senate vote Monday evening to confirm Barret after a weeks-long partisan fight. 

“Republicans do this because they don’t believe Dems have the stones to play hardball like they do,” Ocasio-Cortez added in a follow-up tweet. “And for a long time they’ve been correct. But do not let them bully the public into thinking their bulldozing is normal but a response isn’t."

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“There is a legal process for expansion,” she added. 

Democratic Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarSimmering Democratic tensions show signs of boiling over Pelosi signals no further action against Omar The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Bipartisan group reaches infrastructure deal; many questions remain MORE (Minn.), a fellow "squad" member, retweeted Ocasio-Cortez’s messages Monday evening. 

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“Remember that Republicans have lost 6 of the last 7 popular votes, but have appointed 6 of the last 9 justices," she wrote. “By expanding the court we fix this broken system and have the court better represent the values of the American people.” 

The addition of more justices to the Supreme Court, as well as the end to the Senate filibuster, has been gaining increasing support among Democrats. 

Sen. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsConcerns grow over China's Taiwan plans Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Overnight Defense: Pentagon details military construction projects getting .2B restored from wall funds | Biden chooses former commander to lead Navy | Bill seeks to boost visa program for Afghans who helped US MORE (D-Del.), an ally of Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenEx-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' News leaders deal with the post-Trump era MORE, said earlier this month that he is open to expanding the Supreme Court. 

And Sen. Angus KingAngus KingProgressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Senior Biden cyber nominees sail through Senate hearing Pentagon chief: Military has already started 'over-the-horizon' operations in Afghanistan MORE (I-Maine), long viewed as a key swing vote on the issue, hinted during the Senate's debate that he was open to expanding the Supreme Court, noting that the number of justices is not inscribed in the Constitution. 

“Oh, no! Somebody is talking about breaking the rules and packing the court. Well, of course, Article 3 of the Constitution doesn't establish how many members of the Supreme Court there should be,” King said. 

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"I don't want to pack the court. I don't want to change the number. I don't want to have to do that. But if all of this rule breaking is taking place, what does the majority expect?" he added.

Senate Democrats warned of intense pushback over the GOP push to confirm Barrett just before Election Day, with many pointing out a double standard following Senate Republicans’ refusal to provide a hearing for former President Obama’s pick, Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandGarland sparks anger with willingness to side with Trump Garland vows fight against voting limits that violate law House Democrats push Garland for immigration court reforms MORE, in 2016. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerIt's not just Manchin: No electoral mandate stalls Democrats' leftist agenda DOJ to probe Trump-era subpoenas of lawmaker records Democrats demand Barr, Sessions testify on Apple data subpoenas MORE (D-N.Y.) said Monday night that Republicans may eventually regret their decision to push to confirm President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Ex-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' MORE’s latest nominee. 

"The Republican majority is lighting its credibility on fire. ... The next time the American people give Democrats a majority in this chamber, you will have forfeited the right to tell us how to run that majority," Schumer said. 

"My colleagues may regret this for a lot longer than they think," he added.