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Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever'

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezKamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE (D-N.Y.), in an interview published by Vanity Fair Wednesday, discussed the possibility of her political career extending beyond the House, saying “I don’t see myself really staying where I’m at for the rest of my life.”

“I don’t know if I’m really going to be staying in the House forever, or if I do stay in the House, what that would look like,” she told Vanity Fair. “I don’t see myself really staying where I’m at for the rest of my life.” 

However, she added that she does not “want to aspire to a quote-unquote higher position just for the sake of that title or just for the sake of having a different or higher position.” 

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“I truly make an assessment to see if I can be more effective,” the first-term lawmaker continued. “And so, you know, I don’t know if I could necessarily be more effective in an administration, but, for me, that’s always what the question comes down to.” 

Ocasio-Cortez, who first entered Congress in 2019 after unseating longtime incumbent Joseph Crowley, has been thought to be a potential future primary opponent for Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2022 or Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2024

The New York congresswoman’s alignment with other prominent progressives, including Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersClyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts Prepare for buyers' remorse when Biden/Harris nationalize health care Biden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members MORE (I-Vt.), could also land her support among the more liberal wing of the Democratic Party in a presidential bid, although Ocasio-Cortez would not meet the constitutional age requirement of 35 until November 2024.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSAID administrator tests positive for COVID-19 Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year DOJ appeals ruling preventing it from replacing Trump in E. Jean Carroll defamation lawsuit MORE has commented on the possibility of Ocasio-Cortez unseating Schumer, writing in a June tweet “that would be a big improvement- and she would win!” 

However, Trump has taken aim at Ocasio-Cortez and other progressive members of Congress, repeatedly claiming that Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHarris says she has 'not yet' spoken to Pence Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Obama: Republican Party members believe 'white males are victims' MORE is being steered by the more liberal party members. 

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In May, the Biden campaign brought the congresswoman on to serve as co-chairwoman of the Biden-Sanders joint task force to advise the Biden campaign on climate change policy. 

Ocasio-Cortez had backed Sanders during his 2020 presidential campaign.

During an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday, Ocasio-Cortez said that before battling over specific policy proposals, Democrats and young voters have to prioritize helping Biden win the presidential election, saying it will be a “luxury” to be able to lobby a Democratic administration.

However, when asked if Sanders should be offered a cabinet position if Biden wins, Ocasio-Cortez said it will be “critically important that the Biden administration appoint progressive leaders.”