SPONSORED:

House GOP lawmaker: Biden should be recognized as president-elect

Rep. Tom ReedTom ReedDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Bipartisan lawmakers call for expedited diabetes research The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Dems push McConnell on COVID-19 relief; Grassley contracts COVID-19 MORE (R-N.Y.), a co-chair of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, said Tuesday that Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation US records 2,300 COVID-19 deaths as pandemic rises with holidays MORE should be recognized as the president-elect while many top Republicans in Congress are still siding with President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE in refusing to concede the election.

Most Republicans in Congress are backing Trump's efforts to challenge his loss to Biden, despite the lack of evidence of voter fraud.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHarris says she has 'not yet' spoken to Pence Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Feinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight MORE (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTop Republicans praise Trump's Flynn pardon Richmond says GOP 'reluctant to stand up and tell the emperor he wears no clothes' Sunday shows preview: Biden transition, COVID-19 spike in spotlight MORE (R-Calif.) have so far declined to acknowledge Biden as the president-elect and defended the Trump campaign's legal efforts claiming voting irregularities in states where he is trailing in the vote count.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reed issued a statement congratulating Biden within hours of his projected victory on Saturday, and on Tuesday said that Republicans should recognize the outcome if there isn't evidence to back up the Trump campaign's claims.

"Joe Biden has rightfully earned the title of being the projected president-elect and that should be recognized," Reed said on a call with reporters.

Reed said that Republicans and Trump should be prepared to move on with the transition of power if there isn't evidence of voter fraud that would change the election results.

"If the evidence is not there, then I think it's incumbent upon us as a Republican Party and the president himself to recognize that what we pride ourselves [on] in America is a peaceful transition of power," Reed said.

"And I'm confident the president will do that and recognize that if the lawsuit is not substantiated by the courts in regards to the claims, that we will do what we do best in America and lead the world with our democratic process rather than having some sort of dysfunction in regards to what has been a rich 200-year-plus history of transition of power," he continued.

ADVERTISEMENT

A handful of other GOP lawmakers have also publicly acknowledged Biden as the president-elect, including Sens. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyBiden teams to meet with Trump administration agencies Paul Ryan calls for Trump to accept results: 'The election is over' Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism MORE (Utah), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump administration denies permit for controversial Pebble Mine Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Alaska) and Ben SasseBen SasseTrump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right Whoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' MORE (Neb.), as well as Reps. Francis RooneyLaurence (Francis) Francis RooneyTime to concede: The peaceful transition of power is an American tradition House GOP lawmaker: Biden should be recognized as president-elect Most Republicans avoid challenging Trump on election MORE (Fla.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerFirst release from Fox News Books reaches No. 2 on Amazon top-seller list GOP lawmaker says colleagues 'waiting' for Trump to come to terms with loss GOP lawmaker: Trump implementing a 'loyalty purge' amid firing of top cybersecurity official MORE (Ill.), Paul MitchellPaul MitchellHere are the 17 GOP women newly elected to the House this year House GOP lawmaker: Biden should be recognized as president-elect Most Republicans avoid challenging Trump on election MORE (Mich.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonPressure grows from GOP for Trump to recognize Biden election win Republican Michigan congressman: 'The people have spoken' GOP lawmaker patience runs thin with Trump tactics MORE (Mich.), Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungTrump administration denies permit for controversial Pebble Mine Rep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 Capitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview MORE (Alaska) and Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members Democrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities MORE (Texas).

McConnell on Monday said that Trump has "every right to look into allegations and request recounts under the law,” though he stopped short of saying there had been voter fraud in the election.

“President Trump is 100 percent within his rights to look into allegations of irregularities and weigh his legal options,” McConnell said.

McCarthy, meanwhile, maintained that there should be time for recounts or legal challenges before declaring a winner in the presidential race.

“What we need in the presidential race is to make sure every legal vote is counted, every recount is complete, and every legal challenge should be heard. Then and only then, will America decide who won the race,” McCarthy told Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoHouse GOP lawmaker: Biden should be recognized as president-elect Most Republicans avoid challenging Trump on election Senate Republicans sit quietly as Trump challenges vote counts MORE on Fox Business over the weekend.

Both the House and Senate passed symbolic resolutions in September affirming commitment to the peaceful transfer of power. The Senate passed its version unanimously, while five House Republicans voted against the lower chamber's version.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Trump administration has delayed the formal transition process given that the president has still not conceded to Biden.

Biden shrugged off Trump's reluctance to acknowledge the election outcome during an appearance on Tuesday.

“I just think it’s an embarrassment, quite frankly," Biden said. "At the end of the day, you know, it’s all going to come to fruition on Jan. 20.”