Rep. Paul Mitchell leaving GOP

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellProposed California maps put incumbents in jeopardy Seven takeaways from California's recall election Opposition to California recall widens in new poll MORE of Michigan announced in a letter on Monday that he was leaving the GOP, citing President TrumpDonald TrumpPredictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure A review of President Biden's first year on border policy  Hannity after Jan. 6 texted McEnany 'no more stolen election talk' in five-point plan for Trump MORE’s actions after the Nov. 3 election as the reason.

In a letter addressed to Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDanielRonna Romney McDanielDNC hits GOP for having 'no agenda,' echoing Biden Romney says it 'would be nuts' for the RNC to block candidates from commission debates Psaki: Why is GOP afraid of presidential debates? MORE and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyHouse GOP leaders vow to end proxy voting despite widespread use among Republicans Jan. 6 committee asks Ivanka Trump to sit for interview How Kevin McCarthy sold his soul to Donald Trump MORE (R-Calif.), obtained by CNN, he explained his decision to leave his party despite years of support.

Mitchell expressed his belief that politicians, including the president, must be willing to accept the outcome of elections whether they win or lose.

ADVERTISEMENT

"It is unacceptable for political candidates to treat our election system as though we are a third-world nation and incite distrust of something so basic as the sanctity of our vote," said Mitchell. "Further, it is unacceptable for the president to attack the Supreme Court of the United States because its judges, both liberal and conservative, did not rule with his side or that 'the Court failed him.' It was our Founding Fathers' objective to insulate the Supreme Court from such blatant political motivations." 

Mitchell appeared to agree with sentiments shared by many GOP members that there had been issues surrounding the election, saying there were likely “administrative errors and even some fraudulent voting likely occurred” due to the sheer size of the voter turnout.

“However, the president and his legal team have failed to provide substantive evidence of fraud or administrative failure on a scale large enough to impact the outcome of the election,” said Mitchell.

Mitchell added, “Ronna, you know Michigan politics well. President Trump did not lose Michigan because of Wayne County, but rather he lost because of dwindling support in areas including Kent and Oakland County, both previous Republican strongholds.”