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Chip Roy challenges seating of House members from six presidential battleground states

Rep. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Roy won't rule out challenging Stefanik for GOP House Conference seat Stefanik formally launches bid to replace Cheney in House GOP leadership MORE (R-Texas) on Sunday challenged the seating of lawmakers from Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

All are states where President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden says Beau's assessment of first 100 days would be 'Be who you are' Biden: McCarthy's support of Cheney ouster is 'above my pay grade' Conservative group sues over prioritization of women, minorities for restaurant aid MORE defeated President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE in November and where Republicans have raised allegations of voter fraud or other irregularities. 

Roy — one of the few conservatives not backing the effort to challenge the results of the presidential election on Jan. 6 — argued that if there was widespread voter fraud to the level that it would change the presidential election results, as many of his colleagues claim, the legitimacy of results down ballot are also called into question.

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"Such allegations – if true – raise significant doubts about the elections of at least some of the members of the United States House of Representatives that, if not formally addressed, could cast a dark cloud of suspicion over the validity of this body for the duration of the 117th Congress," he said in a statement. "After all, those representatives were elected through the very same systems — with the same ballot procedures, with the same signature validations, with the same broadly applied decisions of executive and judicial branch officials — as were the electors chosen for the President of the United States under the laws of those states, which have become the subject of national controversy."

"And while the legislatures of those states have sent us no formal indication that the results of these elections should not be honored by this body, it would confound basic human reason if the presidential results were to face objection while the congressional results of the same process escaped without public scrutiny," he added.

Each of the six states in question has certified Biden as the winner of the election and said there was nothing improper about the election.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerWhat's a party caucus chair worth? House fails to pass drug bill amid Jan. 6 tensions Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (D-Md.) quickly objected to Roy’s attempt, offering a resolution authorizing Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Inflation jumps at fastest pace since 2008 | Biden 'encouraged' on bipartisan infrastructure deal Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response Biden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure MORE (D-Calif.) to administer the oath. That resolution easily passed.

Only two lawmakers voted against allowing Pelosi to administer the oath to House members: Reps. Morgan GriffithHoward (Morgan) Morgan GriffithGOP lawmakers press social media giants for data on impacts on children's mental health Lawmakers press federal agencies on scope of SolarWinds attack House Republicans urge Democrats to call hearing with tech CEOs MORE (R-Va.) and Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisGOP doctors in Congress release video urging people to get vaccinated Heated argument erupts after Rep. Mondaire Jones calls GOP objections to DC statehood 'racist trash' Conservative House members call on Senate to oppose ATF nominee MORE (R-Md.).

Updated at 7:45 p.m.