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Washington Republican reverses, says she won't object to Electoral College vote

Washington Republican reverses, says she won't object to Electoral College vote
© Greg Nash

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersNew Alzheimer's drug sparks backlash over FDA, pricing FDA approves first new Alzheimer's drug in almost 20 years OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps MORE (R-Wash.) said on Wednesday that she would not object to the Electoral College vote, reversing course after pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol building.

“What we have seen today is unlawful and unacceptable,” Rodgers said in a statement. "I have decided I will vote to uphold the Electoral College results and I encourage Donald TrumpDonald TrumpMaria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back Republicans eye Nashville crack-up to gain House seat MORE to condemn and put an end to this madness.”

Rioters raided the Capitol as Congress was meeting to certify President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenExpanding child tax credit could lift 4 million children out of poverty: analysis Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back MORE’s Electoral College victory, forcing lawmakers to evacuate. Both chambers were separately debating an objection to Arizona’s electors when the mob forced them to gavel out of session.

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A spokesperson for Rodgers told The Spokesman-Review that the Republican never formally objected when lawmakers began objecting to Arizona's electors, and said she wouldn’t object to other states. She previously planned to object to multiple states' electors, according to the newspaper. 

Amid the violence, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMaria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack GOP increasingly balks at calling Jan. 6 an insurrection MORE’s (D-Calif.) office was vandalized, and a woman died after being shot as demonstrators were entering the Capitol. 

Rodgers slammed the violence, saying “thugs assaulted Capitol Police Officers, breached and defaced our Capitol Building, put people’s lives in danger, and disregarded the values we hold dear as Americans. To anyone involved, shame on you.”

She added that the only reason she objected was to “give voice to the concern that governors and courts unilaterally changed election procedures without the will of the people and outside of the legislative process.”

“I have been consistent in my belief that Americans should utilize the Constitutional tools and legal processes available to seek answers to their questions about the 2020 election,” she said.

Despite the violence, lawmakers are planning to complete the certification on Wednesday night.