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Cheney says she'll vote to impeach Trump

House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyNew Israeli government should be a teaching moment for global leadership Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' House Democrats to Schumer: Vote again on Jan. 6 probe MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the House, announced Tuesday that she plans to vote to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden prepares to confront Putin Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting Senate investigation of insurrection falls short MORE for inciting a violent mob at the Capitol last week.

Cheney is the first member of House GOP leadership to announce their support for impeachment, breaking with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyPelosi, leaders seek to squelch Omar controversy with rare joint statement Omar: I wasn't equating terrorist organizations with democratic countries Schumer bemoans number of Republicans who believe Trump will be reinstated: 'A glaring warning' MORE (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseWisconsin state lawmaker compares museum mask policy to Nazi Party Overnight Health Care: Public option plan left out of Biden budget proposal | House Republicans demand congressional probe into COVID-19 origin | Half the total US population have received at least one vaccine dose House Republicans demand congressional probe into COVID-19 origin MORE (R-La.) on the matter. Cheney told members on a conference call on Monday evening she felt it was a "vote of conscience," according to one source familiar with her remarks.

"On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic," she said in a statement on Tuesday.

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"Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough. The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.

"I will vote to impeach the President," she said.

Cheney is the second House Republican to announce their formal support of the move, following Rep. John Katko (N.Y.), chairman of the Tuesday Group. Reps. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerCheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin Axios CEO says GOP before Trump will not return MORE (R-Ill.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonFauci: Emails highlight confusion about Trump administration's mixed messages early in pandemic Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (R-Mich.) also announced Tuesday that they would vote to impeach Trump. A handful of other GOP lawmakers have signaled they are open to backing the efforts.

The impeachment resolution, led by Reps. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben Raskin House Democrats to Schumer: Vote again on Jan. 6 probe Democrats claim vindication, GOP cries witch hunt as McGahn finally testifies Trump DOJ seized phone records of New York Times reporters MORE (D-Md.), David CicillineDavid CicillineHillicon Valley: House targets tech giants with antitrust bills | Oversight chair presses JBS over payment to hackers | Trump spokesman to join tech company | YouTube suspends GOP senator House unveils antitrust package to rein in tech giants On the Money: Tech giants face rising pressure from shareholder activists | House Democrats urge IRS to reverse Trump-era rule reducing donor disclosure | Sen. Warren, Jamie Dimon spar over overdraft fees at Senate hearing MORE (D-R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuGaetz, under investigative cloud, questions FBI director Crenshaw trolled after asking for examples of 'woke ideology' in military Kinzinger slams Gaetz speech: 'This is why we need a January 6 commission' MORE (D-Calif.), charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.”

Five people, including Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, died during the riot last week, when a mob of Trump supporters swarmed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden prepares to confront Putin Ukrainian president thanks G-7 nations for statement of support Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting MORE's Electoral College win.

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Cheney also broke with McCarthy and Scalise during the vote challenging the election results on Wednesday and the early hours of Thursday morning, opting not to object to the certification of key swing states.

Trump has repeatedly gone after Cheney — who has broken with him on key issues — railing against her at a rally that took place by the White House just before he called on protesters to go to the Capitol. And the Wyoming Republican has not been afraid to speak out against the president’s rhetoric and policy positions during the course of his presidency.

While he has not made an official announcement, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWhat the Democrats should be doing to reach true bipartisanship Democrats mull overhaul of sweeping election bill McConnell seeks to divide and conquer Democrats MORE (R-Ky.) has signaled to allies that he believes the president committed an impeachable offense, The New York Times first reported.

Updated: 10:15 p.m.