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Cheney says she'll vote to impeach Trump

House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyTop female GOP senator compares Cheney ousting to 'cancel culture' Kinzinger plotted to oust McCarthy after Jan. 6 attack Romney: Removing Cheney from House leadership will cost GOP election votes MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the House, announced Tuesday that she plans to vote to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner says election was not 'stolen,' calls Biden 'our president' Overnight Health Care: FDA authorizes Pfizer vaccine for adolescents | Biden administration reverses limits on LGBTQ health protections Overnight Defense: US fires 30 warning shots at Iranian boats | Kabul attack heightens fears of Afghan women's fates | Democratic Party leaders push Biden on rejoining Iran deal MORE for inciting a violent mob at the Capitol last week.

Cheney is the first member of House GOP leadership to announce their support for impeachment, breaking with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyTop female GOP senator compares Cheney ousting to 'cancel culture' Kinzinger plotted to oust McCarthy after Jan. 6 attack Romney: Removing Cheney from House leadership will cost GOP election votes MORE (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTop female GOP senator compares Cheney ousting to 'cancel culture' McCarthy schedules vote to oust Cheney for Wednesday Trump amplifies attacks on Cheney ahead of key vote MORE (R-La.) on the matter. Cheney told members on a conference call on Monday evening she felt it was a "vote of conscience," according to one source familiar with her remarks.

"On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic," she said in a statement on Tuesday.

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"Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough. The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.

"I will vote to impeach the President," she said.

Cheney is the second House Republican to announce their formal support of the move, following Rep. John Katko (N.Y.), chairman of the Tuesday Group. Reps. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerOvernight Defense: US fires 30 warning shots at Iranian boats | Kabul attack heightens fears of Afghan women's fates | Democratic Party leaders push Biden on rejoining Iran deal Kinzinger plotted to oust McCarthy after Jan. 6 attack Kabul attack spurs fears over fate of Afghan women as US exits MORE (R-Ill.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonCheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women Overnight Energy: Michigan reps reintroduce measure for national 'forever chemicals' standard |  White House says gas tax won't be part of infrastructure bill Mark Ruffalo joins bipartisan lawmakers in introducing chemical regulation bill MORE (R-Mich.) also announced Tuesday that they would vote to impeach Trump. A handful of other GOP lawmakers have signaled they are open to backing the efforts.

The impeachment resolution, led by Reps. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinSix House Democrats ask Garland to review case of lawyer placed under house arrest over Chevron suit Democrats seek to keep spotlight on Capitol siege Congress and the administration cannot play games with the Congressional Review Act MORE (D-Md.), David CicillineDavid CicillineRepublicans float support for antitrust reform after Trump Facebook ban upheld Washington keeps close eye as Apple antitrust fight goes to court Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube execs to testify at Senate hearing on algorithms | Five big players to watch in Big Tech's antitrust fight MORE (D-R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuDemocrats, activists blast Trump DOJ effort to get journalists' phone records Lawmakers praise Biden for expected recognition of Armenian Genocide Overnight Defense: Top Pentagon nominee advances after Harris casts tie-breaker | Air Force general charged with sexual assault first to face court-martial | House passes bill to limit Saudi arms sales MORE (D-Calif.), charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.”

Five people, including Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, died during the riot last week, when a mob of Trump supporters swarmed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCaitlyn Jenner says election was not 'stolen,' calls Biden 'our president' Manchin, Biden huddle amid talk of breaking up T package Overnight Energy: 5 takeaways from the Colonial Pipeline attack | Colonial aims to 'substantially' restore pipeline operations by end of week | Three questions about Biden's conservation goals MORE's Electoral College win.

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Cheney also broke with McCarthy and Scalise during the vote challenging the election results on Wednesday and the early hours of Thursday morning, opting not to object to the certification of key swing states.

Trump has repeatedly gone after Cheney — who has broken with him on key issues — railing against her at a rally that took place by the White House just before he called on protesters to go to the Capitol. And the Wyoming Republican has not been afraid to speak out against the president’s rhetoric and policy positions during the course of his presidency.

While he has not made an official announcement, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellManchin, Biden huddle amid talk of breaking up T package Romney: Removing Cheney from House leadership will cost GOP election votes The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden reverses Trump limits on transgender protections MORE (R-Ky.) has signaled to allies that he believes the president committed an impeachable offense, The New York Times first reported.

Updated: 10:15 p.m.