Cheney says she'll vote to impeach Trump

House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Memo: 2024 chatter reveals Democratic nervousness GOP's McCarthy has little incentive to work with Jan. 6 panel The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the House, announced Tuesday that she plans to vote to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpWendy Sherman takes leading role as Biden's 'hard-nosed' Russia negotiator Senate needs to confirm Deborah Lipstadt as antisemitism envoy — Now Former acting Defense secretary under Trump met with Jan. 6 committee: report MORE for inciting a violent mob at the Capitol last week.

Cheney is the first member of House GOP leadership to announce their support for impeachment, breaking with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyFormer acting Defense secretary under Trump met with Jan. 6 committee: report GOP's McCarthy has little incentive to work with Jan. 6 panel The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump MORE (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseSupreme Court handcuffs Biden on vaccinations House GOP campaign arm rakes in 0M in 2021 House Republicans call for oversight into Biden's 'failed' COVID-19 response MORE (R-La.) on the matter. Cheney told members on a conference call on Monday evening she felt it was a "vote of conscience," according to one source familiar with her remarks.

"On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic," she said in a statement on Tuesday.

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"Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough. The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.

"I will vote to impeach the President," she said.

Cheney is the second House Republican to announce their formal support of the move, following Rep. John Katko (N.Y.), chairman of the Tuesday Group. Reps. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerClyburn says he's worried about losing House, 'losing this democracy' The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump Republican rep who voted to impeach Trump running for reelection MORE (R-Ill.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonThe fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump House Republican, Democrat say political environment on Capitol Hill is 'toxic' Sunday show preview: Omicron surges, and Harris sits for extensive interview MORE (R-Mich.) also announced Tuesday that they would vote to impeach Trump. A handful of other GOP lawmakers have signaled they are open to backing the efforts.

The impeachment resolution, led by Reps. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinCarville advises Democrats to 'quit being a whiny party' Biden makes final Fed board picks House Democrats inquire about possible census undercount in Detroit, other communities MORE (D-Md.), David CicillineDavid CicillineDemocrats eager to fill power vacuum after Pelosi exit In their own words: Lawmakers, staffers remember Jan. 6 insurrection Lawmakers call for investigation into proposed AT&T WarnerMedia, Discovery merger MORE (D-R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuSpace race needs better cybersecurity  Buttigieg touts supply achievements at ports of Los Angeles, Long Beach In their own words: Lawmakers, staffers remember Jan. 6 insurrection MORE (D-Calif.), charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.”

Five people, including Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, died during the riot last week, when a mob of Trump supporters swarmed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCarville advises Democrats to 'quit being a whiny party' Wendy Sherman takes leading role as Biden's 'hard-nosed' Russia negotiator Sullivan: 'It's too soon to tell' if Texas synagogue hostage situation part of broader extremist threat MORE's Electoral College win.

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Cheney also broke with McCarthy and Scalise during the vote challenging the election results on Wednesday and the early hours of Thursday morning, opting not to object to the certification of key swing states.

Trump has repeatedly gone after Cheney — who has broken with him on key issues — railing against her at a rally that took place by the White House just before he called on protesters to go to the Capitol. And the Wyoming Republican has not been afraid to speak out against the president’s rhetoric and policy positions during the course of his presidency.

While he has not made an official announcement, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell​​Democrats make voting rights push ahead of Senate consideration Hogan won't say if he will file to run for Senate by Feb. 22 deadline Voting rights, Trump's Big Lie, and Republicans' problem with minorities MORE (R-Ky.) has signaled to allies that he believes the president committed an impeachable offense, The New York Times first reported.

Updated: 10:15 p.m.