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Cheney says she'll vote to impeach Trump

House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyFive examples of media's sycophancy for Biden on inauguration week House GOP leader says he has 'concerns' over Cheney's impeachment vote Cheney tests Trump grip on GOP post-presidency MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the House, announced Tuesday that she plans to vote to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpMore than two-thirds of Americans approve of Biden's coronavirus response: poll Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor Mexico's president tests positive for COVID-19 MORE for inciting a violent mob at the Capitol last week.

Cheney is the first member of House GOP leadership to announce their support for impeachment, breaking with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyBiden attends first church service as president in DC, stops at local bagel shop House GOP leader says he has 'concerns' over Cheney's impeachment vote McCarthy says he told Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene he disagreed with her impeachment articles against Biden MORE (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseBoycott sham impeachment The Memo: Biden gambles that he can do it all Biden under pressure to deliver more COVID-19 shots MORE (R-La.) on the matter. Cheney told members on a conference call on Monday evening she felt it was a "vote of conscience," according to one source familiar with her remarks.

"On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic," she said in a statement on Tuesday.

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"Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough. The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.

"I will vote to impeach the President," she said.

Cheney is the second House Republican to announce their formal support of the move, following Rep. John Katko (N.Y.), chairman of the Tuesday Group. Reps. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerCheney tests Trump grip on GOP post-presidency National Guard back inside Capitol after having been moved to parking garage Budowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated MORE (R-Ill.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Mich.) also announced Tuesday that they would vote to impeach Trump. A handful of other GOP lawmakers have signaled they are open to backing the efforts.

The impeachment resolution, led by Reps. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinInauguration parties lose the glitz and glamour in 2021 This week: Tensions running high in Trump's final days Democratic lawmaker says 'assassination party' hunted for Pelosi during riot MORE (D-Md.), David CicillineDavid CicillineK Street navigates virtual inauguration week Washington state rep joins list of Republicans voting to impeach Trump Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment MORE (D-R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuHouse Democrats introduce measures to oppose Trump's bomb sale to Saudis Washington state rep joins list of Republicans voting to impeach Trump Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment MORE (D-Calif.), charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.”

Five people, including Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, died during the riot last week, when a mob of Trump supporters swarmed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenFive examples of media's sycophancy for Biden on inauguration week Drastic measures for drastic times — caregiver need mobile health apps Boycott sham impeachment MORE's Electoral College win.

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Cheney also broke with McCarthy and Scalise during the vote challenging the election results on Wednesday and the early hours of Thursday morning, opting not to object to the certification of key swing states.

Trump has repeatedly gone after Cheney — who has broken with him on key issues — railing against her at a rally that took place by the White House just before he called on protesters to go to the Capitol. And the Wyoming Republican has not been afraid to speak out against the president’s rhetoric and policy positions during the course of his presidency.

While he has not made an official announcement, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden attends first church service as president in DC, stops at local bagel shop Harry Reid 'not particularly optimistic' Biden will push to eliminate filibuster Senators spar over validity of Trump impeachment trial MORE (R-Ky.) has signaled to allies that he believes the president committed an impeachable offense, The New York Times first reported.

Updated: 10:15 p.m.