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Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment

Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment
© Greg Nash

A growing number of Republicans are announcing their plans to support impeaching President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE after a violent mob stormed the Capitol last week.

House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyTrump, allies raise pressure on Senate GOP ahead of impeachment Trump establishes 'Office of the Former President' in Florida Cheney spokesperson on Gaetz: 'In Wyoming, the men don't wear make-up' MORE (Wyo.), Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerCheney tests Trump grip on GOP post-presidency National Guard back inside Capitol after having been moved to parking garage Budowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated MORE (R-Ill.) and Tuesday Group Co-Chairs John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoCalls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack Hillicon Valley: Intelligence agency gathers US smartphone location data without warrants, memo says | Democrats seek answers on impact of Russian hack on DOJ, courts | Airbnb offers Biden administration help with vaccine distribution House lawmakers reintroduce bipartisan bill to weed out foreign disinformation on social media MORE (R-N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Mich.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Wash.) all issued statements on Tuesday saying the president’s rhetoric the day of the riot met the threshold of an impeachable offense.

“We’re going to walk down to the Capitol, and we’re going to cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women, and we’re probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them, because you’ll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength, and you have to be strong,” Trump said at a rally in Washington shortly before the Capitol siege.

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The riot led to the death of five people, including Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, when a mob of Trump supporters swarmed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE's Electoral College win.

Katko was the first GOP lawmaker in the House to announce he would vote in favor of the article of impeachment.

“To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy,” he said in the statement. “For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this president.”

Kinzinger, who has been a vocal critic of the president, followed, stating that Trump “used his position in the Executive to attack the Legislative. So in assessing the articles of impeachment brought before the House, I must consider: if these actions — the Article II branch inciting a deadly insurrection against the Article I branch — are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?”

Upton blasted the president for saying his rally remarks the day of the riot were “totally appropriate,” slamming him for not showing remorse.

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Cheney, the only member of House GOP leadership to announce her support of impeachment, said there has “never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

And Herrera Beutler noted that Trump went after Vice President Pence and noted the death of the police officer, stating that “the president’s offenses, in my reading of the Constitution, were impeachable based on the indisputable evidence we already have.”

The impeachment resolution, crafted by Reps. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot Inauguration parties lose the glitz and glamour in 2021 This week: Tensions running high in Trump's final days MORE (D-Md.), David CicillineDavid CicillineHouse formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot K Street navigates virtual inauguration week Washington state rep joins list of Republicans voting to impeach Trump MORE (D-R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuHouse formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot House Democrats introduce measures to oppose Trump's bomb sale to Saudis Washington state rep joins list of Republicans voting to impeach Trump MORE (D-Calif.), charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.”

Numerous members said they have not ruled out the possibility of joining the efforts.

“When it comes to impeachment, it’s something we’re strongly considering at this point,” Rep. Peter Meijer (R-Mich.) said in a video released by a reporter with a Fox affiliate in Michigan.

"I have to sleep on it,” Rep. Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Wash.) said.

While a number of GOP lawmakers have gotten on board with impeachment, others have cautioned they think it could spark further violence, instead preferring to go the route of a censure.

A group of members led by Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickCalls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack Trump's assault on the federal government isn't over Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment MORE (R-Pa.) introduced a censure on Tuesday, making the case they feel it is the effective way to punish Trump as he exits office without further dividing the country.

“President Trump’s attempts to undermine the outcome of the 2020 election have been unconscionable. The combination of a false information campaign coupled with inflammatory rhetoric led to the devastation that I was a personal witness to on the House Floor on Jan. 6. His actions threatened the integrity of our democracy, Congress, and his own vice president. For months, President Trump has been lying to the American people with false information, and giving his supporters false expectations. The election is over,” Fitzpatrick said in a statement.