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Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents

Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents
© Greg Nash

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonFauci: Emails highlight confusion about Trump administration's mixed messages early in pandemic Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (R-Mich.) became the first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents on Wednesday, following the House impeachment of President TrumpDonald TrumpMaria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back Republicans eye Nashville crack-up to gain House seat MORE

Upton previously voted to impeach former President Clinton in 1998.

Upton was one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump this week for “incitement of insurrection” after a pro-Trump mob attacked and vandalized the Capitol on Jan. 6.

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The Michigan representative joined GOP Reps. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyCheney: 'It is disgusting and despicable' to see Gosar 'lie' about Jan. 6 GOP's Stefanik defends Trump DOJ secret subpoenas McCarthy pushes back on Biden criticism of GOP at NATO MORE (Wyo.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKinzinger: Conspiracy theory FBI planned Jan. 6 example of 'legacy of Trump and Trumpism' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin MORE (Ill.), Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel MORE (S.C.), Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezTrump endorses Murkowski challenger The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Past criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries MORE (Ohio), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerBiden needles GOP touting rescue plan they opposed: 'Some people have no shame' GOP leader's Jan. 6 call to Trump draws scrutiny in commission fight Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (Wash.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoDemocratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack House lawmakers roll out legislation to protect schools against hackers Colonial Pipeline may use recovered ransomware attack funds to boost cybersecurity MORE (N.Y.), Peter Meijer (Mich.), Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseProgressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel House lawmakers unveil bill to end ban on Postal Service shipments of alcohol MORE (Wash.) and David ValadaoDavid Goncalves ValadaoProgressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel Five takeaways on the House's return to budget earmarks MORE (Calif.) in supporting the single article of impeachment against Trump. 

Out of those Republicans, only Upton was in the House during the impeachment proceedings for Clinton that revolved around the former president denying a sexual relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

“Both were sad days, but I followed the rules set by our founding fathers and the oath I took," Upton said in a statement to The Hill on Thursday.

Upton voted in favor of three of four articles of impeachment against Clinton, agreeing with all except the allegation that the president abused his power. Two of the articles he supported — alleging perjury in front of a grand jury and obstruction of justice — ended up passing the House. 

Five Democrats voted in support of at least one article of impeachment against Clinton: former Reps. Virgil Goode (Va.), Ralph HallRalph Moody HallUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents John Ratcliffe is the right choice for director of national intelligence — and for America Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief MORE (Texas), Paul McHale (Pa.), Charles Stenholm (Texas) and Gene Taylor (Miss.). None were still serving in the House during either impeachment of Trump.

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The Senate ended up acquitting Clinton of both articles in 1999.

During Trump’s first impeachment proceedings — which centered around accusations that the president asked Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election in exchange for military aid — none of the Republicans in the House supported the articles alleging abuse of power and obstruction of justice.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle MORE (R-Utah) was the only GOP senator who voted to convict Trump on one of the articles, allowing for the president’s acquittal in the Senate.

The Senate trial for Trump’s second impeachment is expected to take place after President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenExpanding child tax credit could lift 4 million children out of poverty: analysis Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back MORE takes office on Jan. 20. At least 17 Republican senators would need to vote with the 50 Democratic senators for Trump to be convicted.

Supporters of the president violently attacked the Capitol last week after Trump encouraged them “to show strength” and “fight like hell” in their opposition of the Electoral College results.

The attacks, which resulted in five deaths, temporarily stalled Congress’s certification of Biden’s election win.

Updated at 2:50 p.m.