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Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents

Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents
© Greg Nash

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonBiden convenes bipartisan meeting on cancer research Republicans, please save your party Democrats snipe on policy, GOP brawls over Trump MORE (R-Mich.) became the first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents on Wednesday, following the House impeachment of President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot Intelligence community investigating links between lawmakers, Capitol rioters Michelle Obama slams 'partisan actions' to 'curtail access to ballot box' MORE

Upton previously voted to impeach former President Clinton in 1998.

Upton was one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump this week for “incitement of insurrection” after a pro-Trump mob attacked and vandalized the Capitol on Jan. 6.

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The Michigan representative joined GOP Reps. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyRepublicans, please save your party House GOP campaign chief: Not helpful for Trump to meddle in primaries Democrats snipe on policy, GOP brawls over Trump MORE (Wyo.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerRepublicans, please save your party House GOP campaign chief: Not helpful for Trump to meddle in primaries Democrats snipe on policy, GOP brawls over Trump MORE (Ill.), Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceRepublicans, please save your party Republican Party going off the rails? Trump unloads on McConnell, promises MAGA primary challengers MORE (S.C.), Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezRepublicans, please save your party House GOP campaign chief: Not helpful for Trump to meddle in primaries Trump endorses Tim Scott for reelection MORE (Ohio), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerRepublicans, please save your party Wray says no evidence of 'antifa' involvement in Jan. 6 attack Arizona rep to play leading role in GOP women's group ahead of midterms MORE (Wash.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHouse-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference Biden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure Federal agencies ordered to patch systems immediately following flaw in Microsoft app MORE (N.Y.), Peter Meijer (Mich.), Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseRepublicans, please save your party Six ways to visualize a divided America Here are the GOP lawmakers censured by Republicans for impeaching Trump MORE (Wash.) and David ValadaoDavid Goncalves ValadaoRepublicans, please save your party Democrats snipe on policy, GOP brawls over Trump Six ways to visualize a divided America MORE (Calif.) in supporting the single article of impeachment against Trump. 

Out of those Republicans, only Upton was in the House during the impeachment proceedings for Clinton that revolved around the former president denying a sexual relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

“Both were sad days, but I followed the rules set by our founding fathers and the oath I took," Upton said in a statement to The Hill on Thursday.

Upton voted in favor of three of four articles of impeachment against Clinton, agreeing with all except the allegation that the president abused his power. Two of the articles he supported — alleging perjury in front of a grand jury and obstruction of justice — ended up passing the House. 

Five Democrats voted in support of at least one article of impeachment against Clinton: former Reps. Virgil Goode (Va.), Ralph HallRalph Moody HallUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents John Ratcliffe is the right choice for director of national intelligence — and for America Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief MORE (Texas), Paul McHale (Pa.), Charles Stenholm (Texas) and Gene Taylor (Miss.). None were still serving in the House during either impeachment of Trump.

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The Senate ended up acquitting Clinton of both articles in 1999.

During Trump’s first impeachment proceedings — which centered around accusations that the president asked Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election in exchange for military aid — none of the Republicans in the House supported the articles alleging abuse of power and obstruction of justice.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRon Johnson grinds Senate to halt, irritating many Romney's TRUST Act is a Trojan Horse to cut seniors' benefits Republicans, please save your party MORE (R-Utah) was the only GOP senator who voted to convict Trump on one of the articles, allowing for the president’s acquittal in the Senate.

The Senate trial for Trump’s second impeachment is expected to take place after President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot FireEye finds evidence Chinese hackers exploited Microsoft email app flaw since January Biden officials to travel to border amid influx of young migrants MORE takes office on Jan. 20. At least 17 Republican senators would need to vote with the 50 Democratic senators for Trump to be convicted.

Supporters of the president violently attacked the Capitol last week after Trump encouraged them “to show strength” and “fight like hell” in their opposition of the Electoral College results.

The attacks, which resulted in five deaths, temporarily stalled Congress’s certification of Biden’s election win.

Updated at 2:50 p.m.