McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyTrump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios GOP lawmakers request Cuba meeting with Biden House rejects GOP effort to seat McCarthy's picks for Jan. 6 panel MORE (R-Calif.) said that he would “bet my house” that Republicans win the back majority in the House in 2022.

During an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), McCarthy was asked by American Conservative Union Chair Matt Schlapp about what the minority leader thought the likelihood is of Republicans taking back the lower chamber in the next midterm cycle. 

“We’re going to get the majority back. We’re five seats away,” McCarthy exclaimed. “I would bet my house” on it, he continued. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Democrats won back control of the House in the so-called "blue wave" in the 2018 midterms, and won the House, Senate and White House in the 2020 elections. 

However, Republicans exceeded expectations in the last election cycle when they were projected to lose 15 members, flipping several seats in the House and winning seats eyed by Democrats in the Senate.

Democrats currently only hold five seats over Republicans in the House, the narrowest House majority in modern history, and have a razor-thin advantage in a 50-50 Senate, with Vice President Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote. 

"My personal house, don't tell my wife, but I would bet it" McCarthy joked. "This is the smallest majority the Democrats have had in 100 years." 

McCarthy also credited former President Donald Trump with Republicans gaining seats in the House, stating his campaigning is what helped voters get out to vote on election day. 

“This is the first time since 1994 that no incumbent Republican lost. We beat 15 Democrats. You know who the 15 Democrats lost to? Conservative women and conservative minorities,” McCarthy said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

 

 

The comments from McCarthy come as the GOP has faced intra-party divisions following Trump's tenure in the White House. The Capitol riots that shook Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6 have further driven a wedge between GOP House leadership on whether to stick by the former president, with No. 3 Republican Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyTrump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios House rejects GOP effort to seat McCarthy's picks for Jan. 6 panel GOP brawls over Trump on eve of first Jan. 6 hearing MORE (R-Wy.) voting to impeach Trump earlier this year. 

Cheney also broke with McCarthy while standing just feet away from him during a press conference where the two addressed whether or not Trump should address CPAC. McCarthy quickly stated that Trump "should" be present at the annual event. 

Cheney, however, stated: “That’s up to CPAC."

"I’ve been clear about my views about President TrumpDonald TrumpCuban embassy in Paris attacked by gasoline bombs Trump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios Trump endorses Ken Paxton over George P. Bush in Texas attorney general race MORE and the extent to which, following Jan. 6, I don’t think he should be playing a role in the future of party," she continued. 

The press briefing concluded abruptly after McCarthy said, "On that high note, thank you very much.”