Fitzpatrick replaces Tom Reed as House Problem Solvers co-chair

Fitzpatrick replaces Tom Reed as House Problem Solvers co-chair
© Greg Nash

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDemocrats seek to calm nervous left Biden's corporate tax hike is bad for growth — try a carbon tax instead Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Pa.) was tapped on Wednesday to serve as the co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, replacing Rep. Tom ReedTom ReedThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel Lawmakers brace for battles with colleagues as redistricting kicks off Hundreds of businesses sign on to support LGBTQ rights legislation MORE (R-N.Y.), who is retiring at the end of his term following accusations of sexual harassment.

Fitzpatrick will serve as the GOP counterpart to Problem Solvers Co-chairman Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerLawmakers spend more on personal security in wake of insurrection Six takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections Democrats face daunting hurdles despite promising start MORE (D-N.J.) 

“Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) was elected the new Co-Chair of the bipartisan, 58-member-strong Problem Solvers Caucus. Tom Reed (R-NY) will remain an active member of PSC & be part of a multi-month transition, helping ensure the Caucus continues its mission of bipartisan governing,” the group announced in a tweet. 

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The group has risen in prominence since the start of the 117th Congress due to the razor-thin majorities in both chambers. Members of the group played a key role in moving the needle on COVID-19 relief negotiations after a months-long stalemate late last year.

The Problem Solvers Caucus was first established in 2017 with the intention of helping bridge the hyperpartisan climate seen in recent years and help members work together to get bills signed into law. 

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The group is slated to play a significant role as lawmakers look to find common ground as the Biden Administration looks to move forward with a sweeping infrastructure plan. 

Reed announced that he would not seek reelection last month following a Washington Post report detailing former lobbyist Nicolette Davis’s accusations that the congressman sexually harassed her in 2017. Reed released a statement after the story was published apologizing to Davis and stating he would step down at the end of his term. 

“Even though I am only hearing of this matter as stated by Ms. Davis in the article now, I hear her voice and will not dismiss her. In reflection, my personal depiction of this event is irrelevant,” he said. “Simply put, my behavior caused her pain, showed her disrespect and was unprofessional. I was wrong, I am sorry, and I take full responsibility.”