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Hoyer: GOP lawmakers mad at Cheney because she 'believes in the truth'

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerBiden signs Juneteenth bill: 'Great nations don't ignore their most painful moments' House passes political spending, climate change corporate disclosures bill House to vote Wednesday on making Juneteenth a federal holiday MORE (D-Md.) said Wednesday that it is a "shame" that Republicans are on the verge of ousting Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyCheney: 'It is disgusting and despicable' to see Gosar 'lie' about Jan. 6 GOP's Stefanik defends Trump DOJ secret subpoenas McCarthy pushes back on Biden criticism of GOP at NATO MORE (R-Wyo.) as a member of House leadership because she rejects former President TrumpDonald TrumpWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Poll: 30 percent of GOP voters believe Trump will 'likely' be reinstated this year Black Secret Service agent told Trump it was offensive to hold rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth: report MORE's false claims about election fraud.

“I think Liz Cheney’s greatest offense apparently is she is principled and she believes in the truth,” Hoyer told Washington Post columnist Karen Tumulty during a Post Live event.

“She’s obviously a very conservative Republican from the state of Wyoming, so it’s not a question of ideology. It’s a question of cult. It's a question of cult of personality — that if you’re not 1,000 percent for Donald Trump, somehow you’re not a good Republican, you’re not worthy of being in the leadership," Hoyer continued.

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"It is a shame that the party has fallen to the place where a Liz Cheney, as I said, principled, committed to the truth and a conservative Republican, is somehow not accepted as a leader in the Republican Party," he said.

The top two House Republicans, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyHouse Democrats' campaign arm raises almost million in May Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Environmental groups urge congressional leaders to leave climate provisions in infrastructure package MORE (Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseHillicon Valley: Senate unanimously confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar | Scrutiny mounts on Microsoft's surveillance technology | Senators unveil bill to crack down on cyber criminals Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision FCC votes to advance proposed ban on Chinese telecom equipment MORE (La.), have both begun publicly breaking with Cheney in recent days as a growing number of GOP lawmakers call for removing her from the third-ranking leadership post.

McCarthy said on a hot mic before a Fox News interview on Tuesday that he's "had it with her" and "lost confidence," while Scalise is openly expressing support for Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Canadian ambassador calls for close coordination in handling of US border Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision MORE (R-N.Y.) to replace Cheney as GOP conference chair.

McCarthy said on air during the Fox News interview that Republicans are concerned that Cheney, who voted to impeach Trump for inciting the mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, isn't carrying the message that most members of the party want.

“There's no concern about how she voted on impeachment. That decision has been made. I have heard from members concerned about her ability to carry out the job as conference chair — to carry out the message,” McCarthy said.

A Cheney spokesperson responded to McCarthy by saying she won't "perpetuate lies" or "whitewash" the Jan. 6 insurrection.

"This is about whether the Republican Party is going to perpetuate lies about the 2020 election and attempt to whitewash what happened on Jan 6. Liz will not do that. That is the issue," Jeremy Adler, a spokesperson for Cheney, told The Hill.