WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill

House Democratic leaders are vowing to follow through with a pledge to moderate lawmakers to vote on the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill — but they risk going to the floor without enough votes to pass it.

Progressives insist that they won’t hesitate to vote down the bipartisan bill if the larger, Democratic-only $3.5 trillion package to expand social safety net programs and other top liberal priorities isn’t done yet. They say more than half of the 96-member Congressional Progressive Caucus will vote against the bill if their demands aren't met.

And while a number of members are not publicly revealing their positions, those who are represent a large enough group to tank the bill.

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“They can take that bet if they want,” Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalWhich proposals will survive in the Democrats' spending plan? Proposals to reform supports for parents face chopping block Democrats see light at end of tunnel on Biden agenda MORE (D-Wash.) said Sept. 21. “We would still have enough votes to defeat it.”

House Democrats can only afford up to three defections with their historically thin majority and pass legislation without any support from Republicans.

GOP leaders are whipping against the bill, and spokespeople for several Republican members of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus say they will vote against the measure. Those lawmakers include Reps. Ben ClineBenjamin (Ben) Lee ClineWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Pulling back the curtain on DC's rulemakers? Virginia Democrats seek to tie Youngkin to Trump's election claims MORE (Va.), Peter MeijerPeter MeijerThe 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble MORE (Mich.), Dan MeuserDaniel (Dan) MeuserREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE (Pa.), Bryan Steil (Wis.) and Van TaylorVan TaylorWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Shakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel MORE (Texas).

But some GOP supporters have mounted a counter effort to convince Republicans in the House to back the measure.

Here’s a tally of which Republicans are pledging to support the measure, as well as lists of the Democrats who say they will not back it without further commitments on the larger spending package, and those who say they will back it.

RECENT UPDATES: Teresa Leger Fernandez (N.M.), Chrissy Houlahan (Pa.) and Nydia Velázquez (N.Y.).

 

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REPUBLICANS (7)

Don Bacon (Neb.)

Bacon, a member of the Problem Solvers Caucus, confirmed to The Hill that he intends to vote for the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickTo sustain humanity COP26 must lead on both climate and biodiversity House passes bill to expand workplace protections for nursing mothers The 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress MORE (Pa.)

The co-chair of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, Fitzpatrick says he will back the bill.

John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoThe 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress Lawmakers advocate for establishment of standalone House and Senate cyber panels MORE (N.Y.)

A spokesperson for Katko, another Problem Solvers Caucus member, told The Hill that he plans to back the legislation.

Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerThe 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress Cheney reveals GOP's Banks claimed he was Jan. 6 panel's ranking member House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress MORE (Ill.)

Kinzinger has broken with his party on several issues, including former President TrumpDonald TrumpGrant Woods, longtime friend of McCain and former Arizona AG, dies at 67 Super PACs release ad campaign hitting Vance over past comments on Trump Glasgow summit raises stakes for Biden deal MORE's impeachment, and has indicated he will back the infrastructure bill. "I support the legislation passed by the Senate, as well as the bipartisan negotiations that made it possible," Kinzinger said after Senate passage in August.

Tom ReedTom ReedDemocratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble Fifth House Republican comes out in support of bipartisan infrastructure bill MORE (N.Y.)

Reed, the former Problem Solvers co-chair, told The Hill that he plans to vote for the bill.

Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonThe 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble MORE (Mich.)

"Our infrastructure in Michigan is woeful. We need to rebuild our roads, bridges & ports. We need to expand rural broadband. We need to strengthen our energy grid. The bipartisan infrastructure bill does just that & more. Let's do our jobs & pass this commonsense bill ASAP," Upton tweeted Sept. 22.

Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungHouse passes bill to expand workplace protections for nursing mothers Alaska tribal groups race to spend COVID-19 relief money WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (Alaska)

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A spokesperson for Young confirmed to The Hill that he will vote for the bill.  

 

DEMOCRATS

OPPOSE (21)

Jamaal Bowman (N.Y.)

Bowman told reporters at the Capitol on Sept. 29 that "I will be a no" on the bipartisan infrastructure bill without the social spending package in hand.

Cori BushCori BushHouse progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Emanuel to take hot seat in Senate confirmation hearing Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' MORE (Mo.)

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"I will not support and vote for a bipartisan infrastructure bill that comes before reconciliation," Bush, a member of the "squad," said Sept. 21 on MSNBC's "The ReidOut."

Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeThe developed world should help countries on the frontlines of the climate crisis Lawmakers, security experts call for beefing up cybersecurity Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Congress looks to strengthen government's aging cyber infrastructure MORE (N.Y.)

“I cannot in good conscience support this ‘bipartisan’ infrastructure deal — which seems to lack any meaningful Republican support in the House — without assurances the Build Back Better Act will become law and not watered down by special interests seeking to maintain a status quo,” Clarke said in a Sept. 21 statement.

Mark DeSaulnierMark James DeSaulnierWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Overnight Health Care: CDC says three feet of distance safe in schools | Surging COVID-19 cases in Europe, Brazil signal warning for US | Biden jabs Trump in first visit to CDC Democrats unveil bill to prevent members of the Sackler family from evading lawsuits through bankruptcy MORE (Calif.)

“It is past time for us to invest in traditional infrastructure, but America has never invested in human infrastructure in the way the rest of the developed world has. We have to invest in both, and we cannot do one without the other. The stakes are too high and America’s working families have been left behind for too long,” DeSaulnier said in a Sept. 22 statement.

Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Build Back Better items on chopping block Progressives say go big and make life hard for GOP Three Democrats call for investigation into Sidney Powell to move 'swiftly' MORE (Texas)

“I won’t support the bipartisan infrastructure bill until we first pass the Build Back Better Act,” Escobar tweeted on Sept. 23.

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Jesús García (Ill.)

“Not knowing more details,” Garcia said of the social spending package, “I remain committed to that proposition" to oppose the infrastructure bill Monday.

“I am prepared to vote NO on the Senate’s ‘BIF’ unless and until we know that the Build Back Better Act will also become law,” Huffman tweeted on Sept. 21. “This is not just about political leverage, it’s about policy and preserving a livable planet.”

Pramila Jayapal (Wash.)

Jayapal, the chairwoman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, has vowed that more than half her group won’t back the bipartisan infrastructure bill if the $3.5 trillion package isn’t ready yet.

Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonDraft Georgia congressional lines target McBath, shore up Bourdeaux Overnight Defense & National Security — Iron Dome funding clears House Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by AM General — Defense bill takes center stage MORE (Ga.)

“I will vote NO on BIF unless the Senate passes BBB, so we can finally empower human infrastructure and women,” Johnson tweeted on Sept. 23. 

Andy LevinAndrew (Andy) LevinUS faces daunting task in relationship with Haiti House appears poised to pull infrastructure vote amid stubborn stalemate Recommitting US policy toward two-state solution is the best way to further Middle East peace MORE (Mich.)

“We said what we said,” Levin tweeted Sept. 21. “No bipartisan infrastructure bill without the Build Back Better Act.”

Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaSunday shows preview: CDC signs off on 'mix and match' vaccine boosters Democrats brush off risks of paring down spending package Proposals to reform supports for parents face chopping block MORE (Calif.) 

Khanna told CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperJon Stewart: It's a 'mistake' to focus all on Trump Buttigieg says delay in climate action will cost lives amid reports of Manchin roadblock Buttigieg says supply chain troubles could last into next year MORE on Sept. 24 that he would vote against the infrastructure bill if it was put on the floor without the demands of progressives being met. He predicted as many as 49 Democrats would vote "no" if the vote was held in such a situation.

Mondaire JonesMondaire JonesClimate advocates turn sights on Wall Street House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Democrats look for plan B on filibuster MORE (N.Y.)

"We've been clear all along: the Senate's bipartisan infrastructure deal and the Build Back Better bill must move in tandem," Jones tweeted on Sept. 21. "I'm looking forward to voting for the Senate deal if, and only if, we also pass a reconciliation bill that meets this moment."

Teresa Leger Fernandez (N.M.)

"We promised our communities the Build Back Better Plan with the infrastructure bill together - they deserve nothing less," Leger Fernandez tweeted on Sept. 30 after House Democratic leaders postponed a vote on the bill. "I’ll continue to #HoldTheLine until we keep our promise."

Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHouse progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Schumer endorses democratic socialist India Walton in Buffalo mayor's race Toomey takes aim at Schumer's spending windfall for NYC public housing MORE (N.Y.)

Ocasio-Cortez has vowed for weeks that progressives will hold to their end of the "bargain" and withhold votes if the reconciliation package they want isn't passed yet.

"If there is not a reconciliation bill in the House and if the Senate does not pass the reconciliation bill, we will uphold our end of the bargain and not pass the bipartisan bill until we get all of these investments in," Ocasio-Cortez said on CNN's "State of the Union" last month.

Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDozens of Democrats call for spending bill to pass 'climate test' House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed MORE (Minn.)

Omar, another member of the “squad” who serves as the Progressive Caucus whip, has been adamant that progressives will not back the bipartisan bill without the social spending package in hand.

Mark PocanMark William PocanFox's Bill Hemmer to Democrat: 'Do you consider yourself a capitalist or a socialist?' Progressives say go big and make life hard for GOP Left doubles down on aggressive strategy MORE (Wis.)

“What they're really doing, honestly, is they're protecting the special interests that don't want to pay for this,” Pocan said of centrists balking at the $3.5 trillion package during a virtual town hall on Sept. 21. “The best way we make sure that doesn't happen is we don't vote for one bill without the other. Because if we vote for the infrastructure bill, I don't know if some of the senators who are, let's just say, a little more special-interest friendly will do the right thing and get the other bill done.”

Katie Porter (Calif.)

"Congress now faces a choice: advance the entirety of an agenda that gets American families the help they need, or deliver only a fraction of it. That's why we, as leaders of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, remain committed to voting for the infrastructure bill only after the Build Back Better Act is passed," Porter, the Progressive Caucus deputy chair, wrote in a joint CNN op-ed on Sept. 27 with Jayapal and Omar.

Jan. Schakowsky (Ill.)

"If she [Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: CDC signs off on 'mix and match' vaccine boosters Buttigieg aims to use Tucker Carlson flap to spotlight paternity leave Judge to hear Trump's case against Jan. 6 committee in November MORE (D-Calif.)] were to call the bill, it will fail," the Illinois Democrat told The Hill on Sept. 28. Schakowsky, a close ally of Pelosi's, added: "Not because the Progressive Caucus, people like me, aren't willing to vote for it. But ... we had an agreement that we were going to get these two pieces [together]."

Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibClimate advocates turn sights on Wall Street House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' MORE (Mich.)

Tlaib, a “squad” member, confirmed that she would also vote against the bipartisan bill until the larger social benefits package is completed. “Same here,” she tweeted on Sept. 21 in response to Huffman.

 
"Before we take action on the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act in the House, we must have a clear path forward from the Senate on the Build Back Better Act," Tonko tweeted.

Nydia Velázquez (N.Y.)

"We have a chance for a once-in-a-generation investment in working families and in the future of our planet," Velázquez tweeted on Sept. 30. "That's why I will not vote for an infrastructure bill without passage of the Build Back Better Plan."
 
SUPPORT (23)

Jake AuchinclossJake AuchinclossLawmakers say Biden must do more on global vaccines Lawmakers introduce bill to create commemorative coins to honor working dogs WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (Mass.)

"Whenever the Speaker decides to bring the bill to the floor, Congressman Auchincloss will be a 'yes,' " the lawmaker’s spokesman said. 

Carolyn BourdeauxCarolyn BourdeauxClub for Growth squeezes front-line Democrats on reconciliation plan Draft Georgia congressional lines target McBath, shore up Bourdeaux WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (Ga.)

Bordeaux was part of the group of centrists that pressured Democratic leaders to commit to a Sept. 27 vote as part of a deal to advance a budget resolution to begin the process for the social spending plan in August.

G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldProgressives cheer, moderates groan as Biden visit caps chaotic week  Biden visits Capitol with agenda in the balance WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (N.C.)

"Congressman Butterfield said 'yes' to voting for the Senate-passed infrastructure bill if it is brought to a vote on the House floor,” said De'Marcus Finnell, a spokesperson for Butterfield.

Ed CaseEdward (Ed) CaseMORE (Hawaii)

Case was another member of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaBiden leaves meeting saying 'it doesn't matter' when bill is passed LIVE COVERAGE: Biden tries to unify divided House WHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (Calif.)

Costa was also a member of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

Henry Cuellar (Texas)

Cuellar was part of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiWhy is Biden doubling down on Trump's nuclear expansion? Overnight Defense & National Security — Pentagon officials get grilling from House Defense secretary blames State Department for delay in Afghanistan evacuation MORE (Calif.)

A spokesman for Garamendi said, “Yes, he’ll support it.”

Jared GoldenJared GoldenAnti-Trump Republicans endorsing vulnerable Democrats to prevent GOP takeover Overnight Health Care — Presented by The National Council for Mental Wellbeing — NIH study finds mix-and-match boosters effective Bleak midterm outlook shadows bitter Democratic battle MORE (Maine)

Golden, one of the most vulnerable House Democrats heading into the 2022 midterm elections, was one of the centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

Vicente Gonzalez (Texas)

Gonzalez was another member of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerModerates split over climate plans in Democrats' spending package Bleak midterm outlook shadows bitter Democratic battle Democrats downplay deadlines on Biden's broad spending plan MORE (N.J.)

Gottheimer, a co-chair of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, was the leader of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. He has been outspoken in calling for the vote.

Josh Harder (Calif.)

"I will proudly be voting YES on the bipartisan infrastructure bill this week," Harder tweeted on Sept. 28.

Chrissy Houlahan (Pa.)

"I am in full, enthusiastic support of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act," Houlahan tweeted on Sept. 29. "Failure to deliver this bill during a critical time for our nation is simply not an option."

Susie LeeSuzanne (Susie) Kelley LeeMORE (Nev.)

A spokesperson for Lee, who likely faces a competitive reelection race in 2022, said that she has been “consistent” in calling for a vote “as soon as possible” on the bipartisan bill. Lee was among 10 Democrats who signed a letter to House Democratic leaders in July urging them to hold a vote "without any unnecessary or artificial delay upon arrival from the Senate."

Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasDemocratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse Club for Growth squeezes front-line Democrats on reconciliation plan Gail Huff Brown, wife of Scott Brown, jumps into congressional race in New Hampshire MORE (N.H.)

"I’m disappointed at the games being played by many in Washington - Democrats and Republicans alike," Pappas tweeted on Sept. 30. "We must pass the infrastructure bill while we craft Build Back Better legislation that will protect the planet and improve people’s lives."

Scott PetersScott H. PetersWho is afraid of the EU's carbon border adjustment plan? Overnight Health Care — Presented by The National Council on Mental Wellbeing — Merck asks FDA to authorize five-day COVID-19 treatment Democrats weigh changes to drug pricing measure to win over moderates MORE (Calif.)

“I support immediate action on the bipartisan infrastructure bill,” Peters said in a statement after moderates secured the Sept. 27 pledge in August. “There’s no reason to hold this bill hostage while we work on what’s been left out, which is why I thank Speaker Pelosi and House leadership for making sure we vote on the bill before September 27.”

Dean PhillipsDean PhillipsPhotos of the Week: Congressional Baseball Game, ashen trees and a beach horse Biden visits Capitol with agenda in the balance House Democrats to hold second meeting amid impasse MORE (Minn.)

Phillips in a statement described himself as “among many advocating for the bipartisan infrastructure bill to be brought to the floor independent of reconciliation.”

Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse passes bills to secure telecommunications infrastructure Democrats weigh changes to drug pricing measure to win over moderates Internal battles heat up over Biden agenda MORE (Ore.)

Schrader was another member of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership. 

Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinHouse passes bills to secure telecommunications infrastructure Democrats fret as longshot candidates pull money, attention Bleak midterm outlook shadows bitter Democratic battle MORE (Mich.)

Slotkin, a top GOP target in the 2022 elections, said in August, "I believe that when it comes to the bipartisan infrastructure deal approved by the Senate, we must strike while the iron is hot.”

Haley StevensHaley Maria StevensWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Katie Hill launches effort to protect Democratic majority in House Biden approval ratings drop in seven key congressional districts: GOP-aligned poll MORE (Mich.)

A spokesperson for Stevens confirmed that she will vote for the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

Thomas Suozzi (N.Y.)

A spokesperson for Suozzi said that he will vote for the bipartisan bill.

Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaTwo House Democrats to retire ahead of challenging midterms Two senior House Democrats to retire Democratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse MORE (Texas)

Vela was another member of the group of centrists who secured the Sept. 27 commitment from leadership.

Susan WildSusan WildDemocrats weigh changes to drug pricing measure to win over moderates Biden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  Congress needs to help schools meet mental health challenges MORE (Pa.)

"I’m in full support of the bipartisan infrastructure bill, and I am proud to cast my vote for it today," Wild tweeted on Sept. 30.

John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthDemocrats at odds with Manchin over child tax credit provision The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Biden, Democrats dig into legislative specifics Two House Democrats to retire ahead of challenging midterms MORE (Ky.)

Yarmuth, the House Budget Committee chairman, told reporters on Sept. 22 that he will vote for the bipartisan bill.

Updated on Oct. 1 at 2:32 p.m.