Ocasio-Cortez presses Biden on student debt: 'Doesn't need Manchin's permission for that'

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezLawmakers coming under increased threats — sometimes from one another Maryland Democrat announces positive COVID-19 test Colorado Democrat latest House member to test positive for COVID-19 MORE (D-N.Y.) blasted President BidenJoe BidenMacro grid will keep the lights on Pelosi suggests filibuster supporters 'dishonor' MLK's legacy on voting rights Sanders calls out Manchin, Sinema ahead of filibuster showdown MORE on student loan debt Thursday amid deep cuts to his Build Back Better spending bill, taking a dig at Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinPelosi suggests filibuster supporters 'dishonor' MLK's legacy on voting rights Sanders calls out Manchin, Sinema ahead of filibuster showdown Martin Luther King III: Biden, senators need to use same energy to pass voting rights as they did for infrastructure MORE (D-W.Va.) in the process. 

I think given how much BBB has been slashed, there is more opportunity than ever to bring the heat on Biden to cancel student loans,” she said in an Instagram story.

“He doesn't need Manchin's permission for that, and now that his agenda is thinly sliced, he needs to step up his executive action game and show his commitment to deliver for people,” Ocasio-Cortez added.

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In the negotiations over the social spending and climate change bill, Manchin and fellow centrist Sen. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaPelosi suggests filibuster supporters 'dishonor' MLK's legacy on voting rights Sanders calls out Manchin, Sinema ahead of filibuster showdown Martin Luther King III: Biden, senators need to use same energy to pass voting rights as they did for infrastructure MORE (D-Ariz.) have proven difficult to get on board with several of their party's priorities. 

In the process, the bill has shrunk from its original $3.5 trillion price tag to $1.75 trillion. 

The debate around student loan debt has quieted in recent months as student loan payments are on pause from the pandemic, but it is expected to erupt again when payments are supposed to resume in February.

Top Democrats such as Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerKelly takes under-the-radar approach in Arizona Senate race Hundreds attend mass funeral for victims of Bronx apartment building fire Romney: I never got a call from White House to discuss voting rights MORE (N.Y.) have supported relieving $50,000 of debt for each student. 

While Biden has floated the idea of alleviating some student debt through executive actions, little has been advanced in that area.