House to vote on consolidated election bill Thursday, Pelosi says

The House plans to take up and advance a consolidated election and voting rights bill on Thursday in order to allow the Senate to give it "urgent consideration," Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse has the power to subpoena its members — but does it have the will? Man who threatened to kill Ocasio-Cortez, Pelosi pleads guilty to federal charges The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems look to repackage BBB into salvageable bill MORE (D-Calif.) announced Wednesday evening.

“Under the steady leadership of Chairman Jim McGovern, the House Rules Committee will meet tonight to prepare legislation for the Floor that combines key provisions of two crucial bills: the Senate’s Freedom to Vote Act and the House’s John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act,” Pelosi wrote in a “Dear Colleague” letter on Wednesday.

“After the meeting concludes, the House will convene tonight to pass the Rule for this legislation. Tomorrow, the House will pass the Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act and send it to the Senate for consideration," she added.

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Democratic leaders are pressing ahead in their quest to advance the voting legislation after President BidenJoe BidenUS threatens sweeping export controls against Russian industries Headaches intensify for Democrats in Florida US orders families of embassy staff in Ukraine to leave country MORE delivered a speech in Georgia on Tuesday in which he sought to raise pressure on Senate Democrats to change the chamber's rules in order to pass the bills.

Democrats do not have the 60 votes currently needed to advance the legislation and bypass the Senate filibuster. Two Democrats — Sens. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaVoting rights failed in the Senate — where do we go from here? Biden: A good coach knows when to change up the team The Memo: Biden looks for way to win back deflated Black voters MORE (Ariz.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinVoting rights failed in the Senate — where do we go from here? Biden: A good coach knows when to change up the team The Memo: Biden looks for way to win back deflated Black voters MORE (W.Va.) — have broadly said they do not support getting rid of the legislative rule.

“President Biden made it crystal clear that the Senate must find a path forward to enshrine critical voting rights legislation into law. Tonight, to defend our democracy, House Democrats will take a step to send the Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act to the Senate for urgent consideration,” Pelosi said.

Earlier this week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden: A good coach knows when to change up the team McConnell says he made 'inadvertent omission' in voting remarks amid backlash These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 MORE (R-Ky.) rejected an offer from Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerVoting rights failed in the Senate — where do we go from here? Forced deadline spurs drastic tactic in Congress Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans MORE (D-N.Y.) to hold two simple majority votes on both voting bills in exchange for allowing nearly 20 bills Republicans placed on the Senate calendar to have simple majority votes held.

Schumer told Senate Democrats in a memo on Wednesday that he would use a loophole from a Senate procedure to at least start debate on a bill that would contain aspects of both pieces of voting rights legislation. 

The legislation would still be subject to the 60-vote filibuster in order to pass, but the move would at least begin debate on the legislation.