Limbaugh: Moore was a Democrat at time of sexual misconduct allegations

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh on Tuesday criticized Republicans for distancing themselves from Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore, while saying that Moore was a Democrat at the time he allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with teenage girls.

“Did you know that before 1992, when a lot of this was going on, that Judge Moore was a Democrat?” Limbaugh said on his radio show. “Nobody said a word.”

“When he supposedly was attracted to inappropriately-aged girls — he was a Democrat,” Limbaugh added.

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Limbaugh also went after Republicans who have called on Moore to step aside from the race.

“No matter what the real stories are here, and no matter what the evidence is, these guys, these people on the Republican side, are making it clear they are going to prevent this guy from ever being seated in the United States Senate,” Limbaugh said.

Moore earned an appointment to the circuit trial court in Etowah County in 1992 after switching his political affiliation from Democrat to Republican, according to Politico.

Limbaugh’s remarks come after a fifth woman on Monday accused Moore of sexual misconduct when she was a minor.

Beverly Young Nelson said that Moore, who was serving as the Etowah County district attorney, sexually assaulted her in a diner parking lot in 1977, when she was a 16-year-old high school student.

Nelson’s allegations followed those in a bombshell Washington Post report last week in which four woman accused Moore of sexual misconduct, including one who accused Moore of inappropriate touching when she was 14 and he was 32.

Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations, calling them “completely false.”

Prominent Republicans have called on Moore to step aside from the Alabama Senate race to fill Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe Hill's Morning Report — US strikes approved against Iran pulled back McSally on Moore running for Senate again: 'This place has enough creepy old men' The Hill's Morning Report - Trump to kick off bid for second term in Florida MORE's seat. Strange was appointed after Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump: Appointing Sessions was my biggest mistake Nikki Haley blasts Roy Moore's Senate bid: 'He does not represent our Republican Party' Time magazine: Trump threatened reporter with prison time MORE was appointed attorney general.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellEXCLUSIVE: Trump on reparations: 'I don't see it happening' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (R-Ky.) called for Moore to drop out of the race on Monday while Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerMcSally on Moore running for Senate again: 'This place has enough creepy old men' Hillicon Valley: Senate sets hearing on Facebook's cryptocurrency plans | FTC reportedly investigating YouTube over children's privacy | GOP senator riles tech with bill targeting liability shield | FAA pushed to approve drone deliveries Senate panel advances bill to protect government devices against cyber threats MORE (R-Colo.), who serves as the chairman of the Senate GOP’s campaign arm, said the Senate should expel Moore if he wins the election.