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Limbaugh: Moore was a Democrat at time of sexual misconduct allegations

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh on Tuesday criticized Republicans for distancing themselves from Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore, while saying that Moore was a Democrat at the time he allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with teenage girls.

“Did you know that before 1992, when a lot of this was going on, that Judge Moore was a Democrat?” Limbaugh said on his radio show. “Nobody said a word.”

“When he supposedly was attracted to inappropriately-aged girls — he was a Democrat,” Limbaugh added.

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Limbaugh also went after Republicans who have called on Moore to step aside from the race.

“No matter what the real stories are here, and no matter what the evidence is, these guys, these people on the Republican side, are making it clear they are going to prevent this guy from ever being seated in the United States Senate,” Limbaugh said.

Moore earned an appointment to the circuit trial court in Etowah County in 1992 after switching his political affiliation from Democrat to Republican, according to Politico.

Limbaugh’s remarks come after a fifth woman on Monday accused Moore of sexual misconduct when she was a minor.

Beverly Young Nelson said that Moore, who was serving as the Etowah County district attorney, sexually assaulted her in a diner parking lot in 1977, when she was a 16-year-old high school student.

Nelson’s allegations followed those in a bombshell Washington Post report last week in which four woman accused Moore of sexual misconduct, including one who accused Moore of inappropriate touching when she was 14 and he was 32.

Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations, calling them “completely false.”

Prominent Republicans have called on Moore to step aside from the Alabama Senate race to fill Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangePandemic proves importance of pharmaceutical innovation The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements MORE's seat. Strange was appointed after Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos Garland strikes down Trump-era asylum decisions MORE was appointed attorney general.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Graham calls voting rights bill 'biggest power grab' in history The wild card that might save Democrats in the midterms MORE (R-Ky.) called for Moore to drop out of the race on Monday while Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R-Colo.), who serves as the chairman of the Senate GOP’s campaign arm, said the Senate should expel Moore if he wins the election.