FEATURED:

Omarosa on Robin Roberts's 'Bye Felicia' comment: 'It’s a black woman civil war'

Omarosa Manigault Newman didn't appreciate the "Bye Felicia" comment from ABC host Robin Roberts following the White House aide's exit.

"That was petty," she told "Inside Edition" on Thursday. "It’s a black woman civil war."

Roberts made the comment Thursday morning on ABC's "Good Morning America" when talking about Manigault Newman leaving her White House role.

"She says she has a story to tell, and I'm sure she will be selling that story," Roberts said. "Bye Felicia."

Manigault Newman appeared on the first season of President Trump’s former NBC show “The Apprentice” and has served as the director of communications for the White House Office of Public Liaison. 

On Wednesday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Manigault Newman's resignation would go into effect next month. Trump on Wednesday evening also thanked her for her service and wished her "continued success."

Conflicting reports surfaced Wednesday about whether Manigault Newman was fired or had resigned.

On Thursday, Sanders backed up the White House's statement that she resigned from her position and was not fired, despite reports that she left cursing and screaming after being given her walking papers by chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE.

“As I said, Omarosa resigned from her position. I’m not going to go into a detailed process further than that. I’m not going to get into the weeds of a personnel decision,” Sanders told reporters Thursday.

Manigault Newman has denied reports that she had to be escorted off White House grounds, but said Thursday she has "quite a story to tell" about her tenure.

"I'm not going to expand on it because I still have to go back and work with these individuals, but when I have a chance to tell my story, Michael, quite a story to tell as the only African-American woman in this White House as a senior staff and assistant to the president," she told Michael Strahan on ABC's "Good Morning America."

"I have seen things that made me uncomfortable, that have upset me, that have affected me deeply and emotionally, that has affected my community and my people. And when I can tell my story, it is a profound story that I know the world will want to hear," she said.