Fox Business host slams Trump, GOP tax plan: 'Seems like our country is becoming ungovernable'

Fox Business host Trish Regan slammed the GOP's tax-reform plan on air and on Twitter Monday, asking how it was fair that “a private equity investor has a lower tax bracket” than a New York city police officer while wondering if “our country is becoming ungovernable.”

The commentary from the former CNBC and Bloomberg host comes as Republicans on Capitol Hill are set to hold final votes in the House and Senate on their sweeping tax-reform bill, which would mark President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget GOP presses Trump to make a deal on spending Democrats wary of handing Trump a win on infrastructure MORE's first major legislative victory since taking office on Jan. 20.

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Regan called out the president specifically for failing on his promise to close the special interest loopholes while catering to high-earning “private equity fat cats” during “The Intelligence Report.”

“Those private equity fat cats get away with paying investment taxes instead of income taxes, and this is just wrong,” she said. “So why doesn’t anyone care?’

“I’m beginning to wonder if our country is becoming ungovernable, because I’ll tell you one thing, our founding fathers never ever anticipated a swamp like the one we have today.”

Regan echoed her sentiment on Twitter to her nearly 400,000 followers.

“How is it fair that a private equity investor has a LOWER tax bracket than a NYC Cop?! This is just WRONG! Wasn’t the President supposed to CLOSE these special interest loopholes? Seems like our country is becoming ungovernable,” she repeated.

 

A recent CNN poll shows 95 percent of Democrats think the bill will favor the wealthy, while just 27 percent of Republicans said the same.

No Democrats are expected to vote "yes" on the bill.

Vice President Pence’s office announced on Monday he will delay his planned trip to the Middle East until next month in case his tie-breaking vote is needed in the Senate to pass the bill.