Washington Post suspends reporter for 'inappropriate workplace conduct'

Washington Post suspends reporter for 'inappropriate workplace conduct'
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Washington Post reporter Joel Achenbach has been suspended for 90 days over "inappropriate workplace conduct," according to a Post report.

In his statement to the Post reporter, Achenbach, a science and politics reporter, admitted to the misconduct but did not specify the nature of the claims made against him, only confirming that "women" were the victims.

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“I’m very sorry to say that I’ve behaved badly and have been suspended by The Post for three months for inappropriate workplace conduct," Achenbach said in his statement.

"I’ve said and done things that were unprofessional, and I apologize to the women affected by this and acknowledge their courage in speaking out,” he added.

Washington Post managing editor Tracy Grant confirmed the suspension in the Post report, adding that claims against the staff writer would continue to be investigated.

“We have investigated the allegations made against Joel, and based on the facts that The Post has gathered to date we have placed him on a 90-day disciplinary suspension for inappropriate workplace conduct,” Grant said.

"The Washington Post is committed to providing a safe and respectful work environment for all employees. We will continue to investigate any allegations that come to light and will take further action if necessary," she added.

Achenbach has written for the Post for decades, joining the newspaper in 1990 and covering diverse topics from the Iraq War to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. 

Achenbach's suspension follows similar punishments against other major media figures, including The New York Times's Glenn Thrush who was suspended over sexual misconduct allegations in November.

Other journalists, including Matt LauerMatthew (Matt) Todd LauerFewer men say sexual harassment in the workplace is major problem: Gallup Jenna Bush Hager named as Gifford replacement on 4th hour of 'Today' CEO of Time's Up anti-harassment group steps down, cites 'family concerns' MORE, Mark Halperin and Charlie RoseCharles Peete RoseFewer men say sexual harassment in the workplace is major problem: Gallup Susan Zirinsky to replace David Rhodes as first female head of CBS News Judge rules Harvey Weinstein sexual assault case can move forward MORE have seen their contracts end after sexual misconduct allegations came to light.