Fox's Wallace: Pelosi's 'five white guys' comment is 'a parking ticket' compared to Trump's 's---hole countries'

Fox News host Chris Wallace said Friday that House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDem lawmakers slam Trump’s declassification of Russia documents as ‘brazen abuse of power’ Russia probe accelerates political prospects for House Intel Dems Pelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor MORE's (D-Calif.) comments around "five white guys" working on immigration reform for the GOP is merely "a parking ticket" when compared to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE's "shithole countries" comment around immigration from Haiti, El Salvador and countries in Africa. 

Wallace's remark comes as the president's comment has dominated cable news on Thursday night and Friday and even resulted in National Urban Radio Network White House correspondent and CNN contributor April Ryan shouting a question at Trump during a Martin Luther King Jr. commemoration asking if he "was a racist." 
 
"It was a dumb remark," Wallace said of Pelosi's "five white guys" comment to anchor Sandra Smith on Fox's "America's Newsroom." 
 
"It was representative of the identity politics that Democrats play. Instead of talking about these five individuals who are having this meeting — it was the top vote counters in the House and the Senate, both Republican and Democrat, and also the chief of staff, John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE at the White House," the "Fox News Sunday" host continued. "It was a dumb remark, but I have to say, in all fairness, it’s a parking ticket compared to what the president allegedly said.”
 
Smith played a clip of Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinGrassley to administration: You must consult Congress on refugee cap Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (D-Ill.) stating the president said "shithole countries" in regards to certain nations, which Durbin characterized as "vile and vulgar" and painful "to so many people," she asked Wallace about Trump's apparent denial of the remark.
 
"Chris, I’ll remind everybody that the President said he didn’t use that language," Smith said. "Dick Durbin was in the room and he says he did.”

“Again, the President has not specifically denied that. He has specifically denied that he said, ‘Why do we need more Haitians? Get them out.’ On the s-hole remark, he hasn’t specifically denied that," Wallace noted. 
 
"He just said, ‘I didn’t use the language they quoted.’ But again, specifically it was only the remark about the Haitians. It is kind of an extraordinary moment when we have to caution viewers about language that the president apparently said in the Oval Office writing off whole countries including a whole continent, Africa. It is pretty extraordinary.”

Two GOP senators said Friday they "do not recall" President Trump's reference to "shithole countries" during an Oval Office meeting on immigration. 

Sens. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP senators condemn 'vulgar' messages directed at Collins over Kavanaugh GOP turns its fire on Google Overnight Defense: Trump denies report he's looking at Mattis replacements | Inhofe officially gets Armed Services gavel | Trump revives shutdown threat MORE (R-Ark.) and David Perdue (R-Ga.) issued a joint statement saying they did not recall the president making the exact comments and called out Durbin for confirming the comments. 

"In regards to Senator Durbin’s accusation, we do not recall the President saying these comments specifically but what he did call out was the imbalance in our current immigration system, which does not protect American workers and our national interest," the senators wrote.