Ben Shapiro: 2018 will be 'very, very ugly' for GOP

Ben Shapiro: 2018 will be 'very, very ugly' for GOP
© Greg Nash

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro said that the results in recent special elections show that 2018 could be “very, very ugly” for the GOP.

“In the seven special elections held in 2017, the average shift from 2016 results was D+16. Tonight, it's D+20. 2018 will be very, very ugly unless something cataclysmic happens for GOP,” Shapiro tweeted on Tuesday night.

 

 

The commentator and editor-in-chief of the conservative publication The Daily Wire made the comments during a tight race in the Pennsylvania House special election. President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the Democratic debate As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target Leading Democrats largely pull punches at debate MORE had won the district by nearly 20 points in the 2016 election.

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He said that factors like a strong economy should mean that public opinion is in favor of Republicans while they’re in control of the government.

“Which says that the popularity of the president is a serious factor in Democratic turnout,” Shapiro added.

 

 

He also dismissed comments that described Democratic candidate Conor Lamb as a Republican, saying that Lamb's "a Democrat tailored for the district."

Lamb is facing off against GOP candidate Rick Saccone in a surprisingly competitive race for the Pennsylvania House seat.

"If Democrats are smart enough to run non-Pelosi types in red districts, that will exacerbate the GOP wipeout," Shapiro said, referring to House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiKlobuchar shuts down idea a woman can't beat Trump: 'Pelosi does it every day' Budowsky: Trump destroying GOP in 2018, '19, '20 On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal MORE (D-Calif.).

 

 

 

 

Democrats have pointed to a possible upset by Lamb as an argument to run Democratic candidates in traditionally red districts in an attempt to flip Congress from GOP control.

Democrats have to win 24 seats in the 2018 midterms to take control of the House.